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Hofesh Shechter's Latest Hits North America, Plus Six Other Shows That Sparked Our Interest This Month

Hofesh Shechter's Grand Finale. Photo by Rahi Rezvani, Courtesy Danse Danse.

We are deep into the fall season, and the steady stream of great performances has yet to let up. Here are the shows we're keeping an eye on this month.


It's the End of the World as We Know It

Hofesh Shechter's Grand Finale. Photo by Rahi Rezvani, Courtesy Danse Danse

MONTREAL AND NEW YORK CITY Seductive yet unnerving, Hofesh Shechter's choreography is uniquely polarizing. His newest work, Grand Finale, a maelstrom of 10 dancers and 6 musicians sketching "a world in freefall," promises to be as dark, discomfiting and cathartic as any of his others. It lands in North America this month, appearing first at Montreal's Danse Danse Nov. 1–4 before arriving at Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival Nov. 9–11. hofesh.co.uk.

His/Her/Their Moves Showcased by the Bridge Project

Monique Jenkinson. Photo by Arturo Cosenza, Courtesy Hope Mohr Dance.

SAN FRANCISCO For several years Hope Mohr's Bridge Project has connected history and the present moment, art and intellectual probing. Plunging into the burgeoning area of gender-nonconforming performance, this year's iteration, Radical Movements: Gender and Politics in Performance, asks the question: What does it mean to have a radical body? Radical Movements will be kicked off by a conversation between Monique Jenkinson (aka faux-drag performer Fauxnique) and gender-theory superstar Judith Butler. Other performers include Julie Tolentino, boychild and Miryam Rostami, all of whom walk on the wild side of gender innovation. Nov. 2–12. hopemohr.org.

Chaos=Hope for Threads Dance Project

Threads Dance Project. Photo by Alex Roob, Courtesy The Cowles Center.

MINNEAPOLIS Before she founded Threads Dance Project, choreographer Karen L. Charles made a living as a computer analyst and mathematician—and her latest work combines that dual passion. Taking chaos theory as a starting point, Uncertain Reality postulates that there is hope in chaos and humanizes an otherwise abstract construct. The Cowles Center, Nov. 3–4. thecowlescenter.org.

O Fortuna!

Nicolo Fonte and Ballet West dancers rehearse his Carmina Burana. Photo by Beau Pearson, Courtesy Ballet West.

SALT LAKE CITY In Ballet West's early years, one of the company's mainstays was a Carmina Burana staged by founding artistic director Willam Christensen. Now, resident choreographer Nicolo Fonte is tackling the iconic score. Fonte's new iteration is appearing on a program with George Balanchine's Serenade at both Ballet West and Cincinnati Ballet (in February), providing a stark contrast to the lush neoclassical masterpiece. Nov. 3–4, 8–11. balletwest.org.

David Dorfman Dance, Just Messing Around

David Dorfman Dance. Photo by Adam Campos, Courtesy BAM.

NEW YORK CITY David Dorfman Dance returns to Brooklyn Academy of Music with its signature blend of highly physical group tussles and existential inquiry. With Aroundtown, Dorfman explores what community means in these violently polarized times. Accompanied by electric folk music played live, Aroundtown includes a cameo duet between the choreographer and his wife, Lisa Race. BAM Harvey Theater, Nov. 8–11. bam.org.

An American in...Scotland?

Robert Fairchild. Photo by Matt Trent, Courtesy An American in Paris.

NEW YORK CITY Christopher Wheeldon is tackling another classic musical. But instead of postwar Paris, New York City Center audiences will be transported to a town in the Scottish Highlands that only appears one day every century: Brigadoon. The original 1947 production featured choreography by Agnes de Mille. With Wheeldon at the helm and An American in Paris alums Robert Fairchild and Sara Esty in the cast, the dancing should be in top form. Nov. 15–19. nycitycenter.org.

Bebe Miller Makes Some Dances About Making Dances

Bebe Miller Company. Photo by Julieta Cervantes, Courtesy Bebe Miller Company.

COLUMBUS, OH For choreographer Bebe Miller's latest work In a Rhythm, she and her company turn their attention toward the dancemaking process itself. The hourlong suite of short dances explores the syntax of movement and how we absorb its meaning. Says Miller: "Process is fascinating. The product is whatever it turns out to be, but how we get there and who we get there with is really why I do what I do." Wexner Center, Nov. 30–Dec. 3. bebemillercompany.org.

Contributors: Courtney Escoyne, Wendy Perron, Steve Sucato

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