Our Fave Red Carpet and Behind-the-Scenes Shots From New York City Ballet's 2019 Fall Fashion Gala

New York City Ballet's Fall Fashion Gala always gives us a chance to admire the dancers at their most glamorous, and this year was no exception. From premieres of new works by Lauren Lovette (paired with designer Zac Posen) and Edwaard Liang (with Anna Sui), to a sparkling rendition of Balanchine's Symphony in C, to a star-studded red carpet and reception, we had plenty to swoon over, both onstage and off.


Sarah Jessica Parker, the mastermind behind this annual event, was pretty in pink on the red carpet—and Zac Posen, who designed costumes for Lauren Lovette's The Shaded Line, cleaned up quite nicely as well.

Associate artistic director Wendy Whelan looked elegant (as always) in Chanel.

Choreographer and principal dancer Lauren Lovette got another Fall Fashion Gala premiere under her belt, and then SLAYED in this red Zac Posen number.

It was all a bit of a blur for former principal Robbie Fairchild, who came to support his sister, Megan Fairchild...

When Edwaard Liang joined the cast of his new ballet, Lineage, for curtain calls, Maria Kowroski greeted him with a massive hug that gave us all the warm fuzzies...

...and then they found one another at the post-performance reception (with Kowroski dressed in more Anna Sui, naturally).

Post-performance Indiana Woodward is an entire mood, and perfectly captured how we felt at the end of the whirlwind evening.

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Luke Isley, Courtesy Ballet West

How Do Choreographers Bring Something Fresh to Music We've Heard Over and Over?

In 2007, Oregon Ballet Theatre asked Nicolo Fonte to choreograph a ballet to Maurice Ravel's Boléro. "I said, 'No way. I'm not going near it,' " recalls Fonte. "I don't want to compete with the Béjart version, ice skaters or the movie 10. No, no, no!"

But Fonte's husband encouraged him to "just listen and get a visceral reaction." He did. And Bolero turned into one of Fonte's most requested and successful ballets.

Not all dance renditions of similar warhorse scores have worked out so well. Yet the irresistible siren song of pieces like Stravinsky's The Firebird and The Rite of Spring, as well as the perennial Carmina Burana by Carl Orff, seem too magnetic for choreographers to ignore.

And there are reasons for their popularity. Some were commissioned specifically for dance: Rite and Firebird for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes; Boléro for dance diva Ida Rubinstein's post–Ballets Russes troupe. Hypnotic rhythms (Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel) and danceable melodies (Bizet's Carmen) make a case for physical eye candy. Audience familiarity can also help box office receipts. Still, many choreographers have been sabotaged by the formidable nature and Muzak-y overuse of these iconic compositions.

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