Paul Vasterling. Photo by Anthony Matula

What a Transgender Ballerina Could Bring to Odette, And Other Thoughts on Ballet Today

What should we dance about today and how should we go about it? Those questions were on the mind of Nashville Ballet artistic director Paul Vasterling this summer as he spent six weeks exploring new ways of telling stories through ballet as a fellow at NYU's Center for Ballet and Arts.

Over his 20 years as principal choreographer at NB, Vasterling has created a handful of narrative works, ranging from children's stories to Romeo and Juliet and Lizzie Borden (about the Fall River, Massachusetts woman tried and acquitted for the axe murders of her father and stepmother).

Paul Vasterling with Nashville Ballet dancers. Photo by Anthony Matula


But, he admits, "I rarely have uninterrupted creative time and freedom to let my mind go down all the rabbit holes it should." The fellowship gave him time out to reflect on the genre and find fresh inspiration while watching hour upon hour of ballet, and sharing ideas with a floor full of other artists and researchers.

He shared four takeaways from his time there:

Ballet is too narrow-minded.

"We need to bring in new ideas and encourage ballet choreographers and directors to step out of the usual," says Vasterling. "This profession can be very insular. We tend not to look to the sides."

He feels strongly that the art form will thrive when its makers and doers are exposed to broader ideas—which is why the Center for Ballet and the Arts is so important right now. "This place gives us the opportunity to challenge our norms and our ways of thinking about what a ballet is."

Ballet can be more like poetry than prose.

Years spent making ballets will develop a choreographer's skills and fluency, but it can also lead to not-so-creative habits. The fellowship gave Vasterling time to find a way out of his own creative ruts. "I met many poets during this fellowship and realized I could approach narrative ballet in a different way. It doesn't have to be so literal and so linear," he says.

Realizing it was more helpful to liken ballet storytelling to narrative poetry, with its clear forms and rules, was a breakthrough. "In ballet, we also work with a lot of rules," he says. "Rules are embodied in the technique."

We need to expand the definition of "ballet."

"I want our audiences to understand the vast scope of what a ballet can be," says Vasterling. Pushing that distinction means thinking outside the norm, whether in terms of subject matter, movement vocabulary, use of text and singers, or in performance structure and duration. This raises interesting questions around where exactly we draw the line between ballet and modern dance or musical theatre. But as Vasterling points out, "ballets are made on ballet companies with trained ballet dancers who embody the technique and line inherent in ballet dancing."

It's time to update ballet's approach to gender.

"What's going to happen when we have our first transgender ballerina?" asks Vasterling. Today, there are clear gender lines in ballet. However, ballet is role-playing and in the theater we rely on performers to bring new things to light through their unique qualities and experience. What will a transgender ballerina bring to light in a role like Odette, wonders Vasterling?

Nashville Ballet in Swan Lake, 2014. Photo via nashvillearts.com

"So many things made me go 'Oh wow!' during this process," he says. "Now I am challenging myself to make a new ballet in these terms. I'm nervous about it. It gives me that agitated feeling you get which means you're really going to do it."

Vasterling has headed back to Nashville with a practical outcome from his fellowship: a new libretto written in collaboration with poet Caroline Randall Williams based on her book Lucy Negro, Redux (described as being "part savvy lit crit, part Blues chart, part hip revenge-femme-lyric, part imagined interracial romance saga disguised as poems"). In the book, Randall Williams toys with the notion that the dark lady of Shakespeare's sonnets is a black woman. For the libretto, she and Vasterling weaved together the lives of real and imaginary characters: a present day narrator/poet, Shakespeare, his mysterious dark lady and a younger lover. The ballet will premiere in Nashville in February 2019.

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Rachel Papo

Our 8 Best Pointe Shoe Hacks

It turns out that TikTok is good for more than just viral dance challenges. Case in point: We recently stumbled across this genius pointe shoe hack for dancers with narrow heels.

Dancers are full of all kinds of crafty tricks to make their pointe shoes work for them. But don't fear: You don't need to spend hours scrolling TikTok to find the best pro tips. We rounded up a few of our favorites published in Dance Magazine over the years.

If your vamp isn't long enough, sew an elastic on top of your metatarsals.

Last year, Pacific Northwest Ballet principal Elizabeth Murphy admitted to us that her toes used to flop all the way out of her shoes when she rose up onto pointe(!). "I have really long toes and stock shoes never had a vamp long enough," she says.

Her fix? Sewing a piece of elastic (close to the drawstring but without going through it) at the top of the vamp for more support...and also special-ordering higher vamps.

Solve corns with toe socks

Nashville Ballet's Sarah Cordia told us in 2017 that toe socks are her secret weapon: "I get soft corns in between my toes because I have sweaty feet. Wearing toe socks helps keep that area dry. I found a half-toe sock called 'five-toe heelless half-boat socks' that I now wear in my pointe shoes."

(For other padding game-changers, check out these six ideas.)

Save time by recycling ribbons and elastics.

Don't waste time measuring new ribbons and elastics for every pair. Washington Ballet dancer Ashley Murphy-Wilson told us that she keeps and cycles through about 10 sets of ribbons and crisscross elastics. "It makes sewing new pairs easier because the ribbons and elastic are already at the correct length," she says. Bonus: This also makes your pointe shoe habit more environmentally friendly.

Close-up of hands sewing a pointe shoe.

Murphy-Wilson sewing her shoes

xmbphotography, by Mena Brunette, courtesy The Washington Ballet

Tie your drawstring on demi-pointe.

In 2007, New York City Ballet's Megan Fairchild gave us this tip for making sure her drawstring stays tight: "I always tie it in demi-pointe because that is when there's the biggest gap and where there's the most bagginess on the side."

Find a stronger thread.

When it comes to keeping your ribbons on, function trumps form—audiences won't be able to see your stitches from the stage. Many dancers use floss as a stronger, more secure alternative to thread. Fairchild told us she uses thick crochet thread. "Before I go onstage I sew a couple of stitches in the knot of the ribbon to tack the ends," she says. "I do a big 'X.' I have to make sure it's perfect because I'm in it for the show. It's always the very last thing I do."

Don't simply reorder your shoes on autopilot.

Even as adults, our feet keep growing and spreading as we age. Atlanta podiatrist Frank Sinkoe suggests going to a professional pointe shoe fitter at least once a year to make sure you're in the right shoe.

You might even need different sizes at different times of the year, says New York City Ballet podiatric consultant Thomas Novella. During busy periods and in warm weather, your feet might be bigger than during slow periods in the winter. Have different pairs ready for what your feet need now.

Fit *both* feet.

Don't forget that your feet might even be two different sizes. "If you're getting toenail bruises, blood blisters or other signs of compression, but only on one foot, have someone check each foot's size," Novella says. The solution? Buy two pairs at a time—one for the right foot and one for the left.

Wash off the sweat.

Blisters thrive in a sweaty pointe shoe. Whenever you can, take your feet out of your shoes between rehearsals and give them a quick rinse off in the sink. "If feet sweat, they should be washed periodically during the day with soap and water and dried well, especially between the toes," says Sinkoe.