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NYC's Upcoming Season is Full of Powerful Women

Bausch's Rite of Spring, Courtesy BAM

Maybe it's just by chance, but it seems like the upcoming lineup in New York City is designed to remind us of the women giants of our field. What a great welcome to the new season!

• Twyla Tharp brings new and old work to the Joyce. She may be the most prolific living choreographer in any genre. Her movement is always bursting with inventiveness, and she challenges her mighty dancers with impossibly complex and non-stop motion.


Tharp's Raggedy Dances (1982) with Sara Rudner and Rose Marie Wright, PC William Pierce

• Two formative works by Pina Bausch are coming to Brooklyn Academy of Music: The Rite of Spring and Café Müller. Bausch shook the international dance (and theater) world with her brash and brilliant work 30 years ago. Though she died in 2009, her dancers still make complacency impossible at the same time as they satisfy our lust for a rich, provocative imagination onstage.

• Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker's Vortex Temporum exploded onto the stage of BAM last fall and, in a different version, at the Museum of Modern Art's atrium a few months later. The power of dance and music pushing each other's momentum gives us a visceral thrill. She premieres A Love Supreme with music by John Coltrane at New York Live Arts.

• Germaine Acogny, known as "the mother of contemporary African dance," is a commanding performer in her own right. At the age of 73, she tackles Stravinsky's Rite of Spring at BAM. The solo, titled Mon élue noire (My Black Chosen One): Sacre #2 is choreographed by Olivier Dubois.

• The Trisha Brown Dance Company helps open Fall for Dance at New York City Center with a duet from the 1990s. On the same program is a premiere by a more current giantess—Michelle Dorrance.

Dorrance, center, in her Myelination, PC Julieta Cervantes

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The cast of Dragon Spring Phoenix Rise in rehearsal. Photo by Stephanie Berger, Courtesy The Shed

Akram Khan loves to dive into genres he is unfamiliar with. While his own movement vocabulary is a hybrid of kathak and contemporary dance, he has choreographed a new Giselle for English National Ballet, collaborated with flamenco artist Israel Galván and made a dance theater duet with film star Juliette Binoche. Now, in between touring Xenos, his final full-length solo, and several other projects, he's found time to tackle kung fu. Khan is part of the collaborative team behind Dragon Spring Phoenix Rise, a blockbuster musical based on themes of migration and the fight for survival, running June 22–July 27. Directed by Chen Shi-Zheng and featuring a score that remixes songs by Sia, it's part of the inaugural season of The Shed,
a new venue in New York City.

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Advice for Dancers
Getty Images

I'm a Broadway dancer with a long second toe and the nail is always bruised. I had thought switching from pointe work to dancing in character shoes was the answer—I felt great for several years until recently. What's the problem?

—Ouch!, Hoboken, NJ

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