Bausch's Rite of Spring, Courtesy BAM

NYC's Upcoming Season is Full of Powerful Women

Maybe it's just by chance, but it seems like the upcoming lineup in New York City is designed to remind us of the women giants of our field. What a great welcome to the new season!

• Twyla Tharp brings new and old work to the Joyce. She may be the most prolific living choreographer in any genre. Her movement is always bursting with inventiveness, and she challenges her mighty dancers with impossibly complex and non-stop motion.


Tharp's Raggedy Dances (1982) with Sara Rudner and Rose Marie Wright, PC William Pierce

• Two formative works by Pina Bausch are coming to Brooklyn Academy of Music: The Rite of Spring and Café Müller. Bausch shook the international dance (and theater) world with her brash and brilliant work 30 years ago. Though she died in 2009, her dancers still make complacency impossible at the same time as they satisfy our lust for a rich, provocative imagination onstage.

• Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker's Vortex Temporum exploded onto the stage of BAM last fall and, in a different version, at the Museum of Modern Art's atrium a few months later. The power of dance and music pushing each other's momentum gives us a visceral thrill. She premieres A Love Supreme with music by John Coltrane at New York Live Arts.

• Germaine Acogny, known as "the mother of contemporary African dance," is a commanding performer in her own right. At the age of 73, she tackles Stravinsky's Rite of Spring at BAM. The solo, titled Mon élue noire (My Black Chosen One): Sacre #2 is choreographed by Olivier Dubois.

• The Trisha Brown Dance Company helps open Fall for Dance at New York City Center with a duet from the 1990s. On the same program is a premiere by a more current giantess—Michelle Dorrance.

Dorrance, center, in her Myelination, PC Julieta Cervantes

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Houston Ballet's "Dancing With Myself" Captures How We All Feel Right Now

What are dancers to do when they're still stuck at home in isolation? After all, there's only so much time you can spend taking barre, tackling your reading list (or Netflix queue) or ticking items off your to-do list. Even wistfully looking out the window has lost its appeal after a few months.

That's when you need a dance party—even it's for a party of one.

With its latest digital release, Houston Ballet tapped into our stir-crazy desperation and turned it into a celebration for 61 dancers shaking it in everything from PJs to formal gowns. Rehearsed entirely on Zoom and with choreography by artistic director Stanton Welch, "Dancing With Myself," set to the Billy Idol classic, is the #IFeelSeen moment dancers need right about now.