Bausch's Rite of Spring, Courtesy BAM

NYC's Upcoming Season is Full of Powerful Women

Maybe it's just by chance, but it seems like the upcoming lineup in New York City is designed to remind us of the women giants of our field. What a great welcome to the new season!

• Twyla Tharp brings new and old work to the Joyce. She may be the most prolific living choreographer in any genre. Her movement is always bursting with inventiveness, and she challenges her mighty dancers with impossibly complex and non-stop motion.


Tharp's Raggedy Dances (1982) with Sara Rudner and Rose Marie Wright, PC William Pierce

• Two formative works by Pina Bausch are coming to Brooklyn Academy of Music: The Rite of Spring and Café Müller. Bausch shook the international dance (and theater) world with her brash and brilliant work 30 years ago. Though she died in 2009, her dancers still make complacency impossible at the same time as they satisfy our lust for a rich, provocative imagination onstage.

• Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker's Vortex Temporum exploded onto the stage of BAM last fall and, in a different version, at the Museum of Modern Art's atrium a few months later. The power of dance and music pushing each other's momentum gives us a visceral thrill. She premieres A Love Supreme with music by John Coltrane at New York Live Arts.

• Germaine Acogny, known as "the mother of contemporary African dance," is a commanding performer in her own right. At the age of 73, she tackles Stravinsky's Rite of Spring at BAM. The solo, titled Mon élue noire (My Black Chosen One): Sacre #2 is choreographed by Olivier Dubois.

• The Trisha Brown Dance Company helps open Fall for Dance at New York City Center with a duet from the 1990s. On the same program is a premiere by a more current giantess—Michelle Dorrance.

Dorrance, center, in her Myelination, PC Julieta Cervantes

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Courtesy Schelfhaudt

These Retired Ballroom Dancers Started a Dance-Themed Coffee Company

Like many dancers, when Lauren Schelfhaudt and Jean Paul retired from professional ballroom dancing in 2016, they felt lost. "There was this huge void," says Schelfhaudt.

But after over 20 years of dancing, plus United States and World Championship titles, reality shows, and high-profile choreography gigs (and Paul's special claim to fame, as "the guy who makes Bradley Cooper look bad" in Silver Linings Playbook), teaching just didn't fill the void. "I got to the point where it wasn't giving me that creative outlet," says Paul.

When the pair (who are life and business partners but were never dance partners—they competed against one another) took a post-retirement trip to Costa Rica, they were ready to restart their lives. They found inspiration in an expected place: A visit to a coffee farm.

Though they had no experience in coffee roasting or business, they began building their own coffee company. In 2018, the duo officially launched Dancing Ox Coffee Roasters, where they create dance-inspired blends out of their headquarters in Belmont, North Carolina.

We talked to Schelfhaudt and Paul about how their dance background makes them better coffee roasters, and why coffee is an art form all its own:

GO DEEPER