Clockwise from top left: Courtesy FX; TAS Rights Management, Courtesy Premium PR; Erin Baiano, Courtesy New York City Ballet; Larry Horrocks, Courtesy Sony Pictures Classics; Angela Sterling, Courtesy Boston Ballet; Courtesy Spotlight Cinema Networks

These Are the Dance Moments Our Readers Loved the Most This Year

We asked for your nominations, compiled your suggestions and let you vote on your favorite dance moments of 2019. Here's what you chose:


Best Dance in a Movie

Nominees:

The White Crow

Girl

Rocketman

The Favourite

Yuli

Winner: The White Crow

Winner: "Fosse/Verdon"

Best Dance Documentary

Nominees:

Force of Nature

Nureyev

I Dream of Dance

Winner: Nureyev

Winner: Playlist (EP)

Best Solo Performance

Nominees:

American Ballet Theatre's Sarah Lane in Manon

Ashley Blair Fitzgerald in The Cher Show

Royal Danish Ballet's Jon Axel Fransson in The Kermesse in Bruges

Mariana Valencia in Futurity

New York City Ballet's Taylor Stanley in Apollo

Winner: Taylor Stanley in Apollo

Taylor Stanley in Apollo. He holds a lyre-like instrument, and wears white tights and a white sash. He stands with one leg slightly bent, looking intensely at the audience. He is surrounded by the three muses\u2014women in white leotards and short white skirts\u2014who reach up towards him.

Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB

Winner: Taylor Swift's "ME!"

Latest Posts


Courtesy Esse

What It Was Like When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was in the Audience—or Backstage

The 27 years that Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent on the U.S. Supreme Court were 27 years that she spent as one of Washington, D.C.'s most ardent, elegant and erudite supporters of the performing arts. The justice, who died on September 18 of metastatic cancer, was also an avid cultural tourist, traveling to the Santa Fe and Glimmerglass operas nearly every summer, as well as occasionally returning to catch shows in her native New York City.

Ginsburg's opera fandom was well known, but her tastes were wide-ranging. Particularly in the last 10 years of her life, after Ginsburg lost her beloved husband, Marty, it was not unusual for the petite justice and her security detail to be spotted at theaters several nights a week. She saw everything, from classic musicals to serious new plays, plus performances that defied classification, like Martha Clarke's dance drama Chéri, with Alessandra Ferri and Herman Cornejo, which toured to the Kennedy Center in 2014.

To honor Ginsburg, Dance Magazine asked three dance artists whose performances the justice attended to recall what Ginsburg meant to them.

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