Clockwise from top left: Courtesy FX; TAS Rights Management, Courtesy Premium PR; Erin Baiano, Courtesy New York City Ballet; Larry Horrocks, Courtesy Sony Pictures Classics; Angela Sterling, Courtesy Boston Ballet; Courtesy Spotlight Cinema Networks

These Are the Dance Moments Our Readers Loved the Most This Year

We asked for your nominations, compiled your suggestions and let you vote on your favorite dance moments of 2019. Here's what you chose:


Best Dance in a Movie

Nominees:

The White Crow

Girl

Rocketman

The Favourite

Yuli

Winner: The White Crow

Winner: "Fosse/Verdon"

Best Dance Documentary

Nominees:

Force of Nature

Nureyev

I Dream of Dance

Winner: Nureyev

Winner: Playlist (EP)

Best Solo Performance

Nominees:

American Ballet Theatre's Sarah Lane in Manon

Ashley Blair Fitzgerald in The Cher Show

Royal Danish Ballet's Jon Axel Fransson in The Kermesse in Bruges

Mariana Valencia in Futurity

New York City Ballet's Taylor Stanley in Apollo

Winner: Taylor Stanley in Apollo

Taylor Stanley in Apollo. He holds a lyre-like instrument, and wears white tights and a white sash. He stands with one leg slightly bent, looking intensely at the audience. He is surrounded by the three muses\u2014women in white leotards and short white skirts\u2014who reach up towards him.

Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB

Winner: Taylor Swift's "ME!"

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Jason Samuels Smith, photographed by Jayme Thornton

Moving Forward by Looking Back: A Week at the L.A. Tap Festival Online

I turned to tap at the outset of the European lockdown as a meaningful escape from the anxiety of the pandemic. As a dance historian specialized in dance film, I've seen my fair share of tap on screen, but my own training remains elementary. While sheltering in place, my old hardwood floors beckoned. I wanted to dig deeper in order to better understand tap's origins and how the art form has evolved today. Not so easy to accomplish in France, especially from home.

Enter the L.A. Tap Fest's first online edition.

Alongside 100 other viewers peering out from our respective Zoom windows, I watch a performer tap out rhythms on a board in their living room. Advanced audio settings allow us to hear their feet. In the chat box, valuable resources are being shared and it's common to see questions like, "Can you post the link to that vaudeville book you mentioned?" Greetings and words of gratitude are also exchanged as participants trickle in and out from various times zones across the US and around the world.

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