The Creative Process

How Creating Dance Helps Reggie Wilson "Get Rid" of His Obsessions

Reggie Wilson uses his dances to process ideas. Photo by Aitor Mendilibar

With a blend of postmodern and black aesthetics, Reggie Wilson's work explores connections between secular and spiritual cultures of the African diaspora in the Americas. Audiences are drawn to his unique synergy of formal rigor, playfulness and depth.

The Milwaukee-raised award-winning choreographer formed Reggie Wilson/Fist & Heel Performance Group in Brooklyn in 1989 after dancing for Ohad Naharin. Most recently, he curated the 2018 Danspace Project's Dancing Platform Praying Grounds: Blackness, Churches, and Downtown Dance.


He recently spoke to Dance Magazine about his creative process.

Where His Ideas Come From

Reggie Wilson. Photo by Peggy Woosley.

"An idea hits me and I think, Oh, that's cool. I usually don't follow it when it first happens. And then it will recur and recur, over and over again. It gets to the point of obsession. Making a dance will help me process it, think about it on multiple levels, engage with numerous people and cultures and thinkers."

"I don't ever go with making a piece that will sell. Like the figure of Moses—the idea behind Moses(es)—didn't fit the litmus test of a popular point of research, but I was reading Zora Neale Hurston's Moses, Man of the Mountain, and a dancer's uncle was a Moses scholar. That seems to be the way I operate. The universe or somebody wants me to think about something a little more. Then I have to "get rid of it," which means incorporating it into my everyday existence. Then it stops being disruptive."

What His Research Process Is Like

Wilson loves finding out where his blind spots are. Photo by Jamie Kraus.

"What nurtures the idea is consuming as much information about it as possible. I'll look at Wikipedia, definitions, etymology, a thesaurus. From my first year at NYU, every weekend I'd go stare at the images of Africa in Rizzoli's art books. Or I'd go to a Margaret Mead Film Festival, a dance or music concert. Obsessive. I need to go to this country. Or hang out in this part of the city. Or go to this club. Or this class."

"There's a curiosity for finding out where my blind spots are. "What didn't I know I didn't know?" I get so excited when that shows up."

The Most Surprising Part About Shakers

"Now I'm doing this Shaker stuff in my work. I thought the Shakers were like the Amish or the Puritans. Totally the opposite. You think about rigidity and stricture, the separation of the sexes, but there are a whole bunch of radical ideas—a religious sect channeling innovation in technology and education, always trying to reinvent and discover in their service of spirit."

"Dancing together was important to the Shakers. Their statement "We find no harm in dancing"—in contrast to the way the Puritans thought—repositioned how I regarded them."

His Advice For Young Choreographers

Fist and Heel Performance Group. Photo by Antoine Rempé

"I tell young choreographers to make as much work as possible. Stop being precious. Get your chair dance out. Get your emotional dance out. At the same time, be strategic in what you show and to whom. Everybody doesn't have to see everything. And you can't control what people are going to think."

Dance Training
Robin Worrall via Unsplash

Social media has made the dance world a lot smaller, giving users instant access to artists and companies around the world. For aspiring pros, platforms like Instagram can offer a tantalizing glimpse into the life of a working performer. But there's a fine line between taking advantage of what social media can offer and relying too heavily on it.

Keep reading... Show less
UA Dance Ensemble members Candice Barth and Gregory Taylor in Jessica Lang's "Among the Stars." Photo by Ed Flores, courtesy University of Arizona

If you think becoming a trainee or apprentice is the only path to gaining experience in a dance company environment, think again.

The University of Arizona, located in the heart of Tucson, acclimates dancers to the pace and rigor of company life while offering all the academic opportunities of a globally-ranked university. If you're looking to get a head-start on your professional dance career—or to just have a college experience that balances company-level training and repertory with rigorous academics—the University of Arizona's undergraduate and graduate programs have myriad opportunites to offer:

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers Trending
Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light in DESCENT, which our readers chose as last year's "Most Moving Performance." Photo by Jay Newman, courtesy Kinetic Light

Yes, we realize it's only August. But we can't help but to already be musing about all the incredible dance happenings of 2019.

We're getting ready for our annual Readers' Choice feature, and we want to hear from you about the shows you can't stop thinking about, the dance videos that blew your mind and the artists you discovered this year who everyone should know about.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance History
Sergei Diaghilev, who was terrified of the sea, posing with a life preserver aboard a ship. Photo courtesy DM Archives

On August 19, 1929, shockwaves were felt throughout the dance world as news spread that impresario Sergei Diaghilev had died. The founder of the Ballets Russes rewrote the course of ballet history as the company toured Europe and the U.S., championing collaborations with modernist composers, artists and designers such as Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso and Coco Chanel. The company launched the careers of its five principal choreographers: Michel Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Léonide Massine, Bronislava Nijinska and George Balanchine.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox