PC Monroe Warshaw

Remembering Peter Frame, Former NYCB Dancer And SAB Faculty Member

Peter was deeply loved by his students, friends, and fellow dancers. He was known for his kindness, sensitivity, and generosity of spirit. Friends described him as caring and sweet. Several recalled that he always made time for conversation with them when they ran into him on the Upper West Side. He was very aware and sensitive to people's feelings. The daily life of a ballet dancer is extremely challenging and demanding. Peter demonstrated a deep empathy for his dancers.

Cheerful and optimistic, he enjoyed an impressive forty year association with the prestigious New York City Ballet. He studied at the School of American Ballet, and became a company member under the direction of George Balanchine. He was promoted to principal status. It was an exciting and productive time.


In interviews with the press, Peter expressed deep admiration for Balanchine's genius. He consistently sounded excited, positive and grateful for his opportunities. He was forward thinking and intelligent. When he was younger, he already saw himself transitioning into physical therapy. His vision was on, as he later became the department head for the men's weight training division at SAB. He was extremely popular.

Peter was also exhilarated by his work with Paul Taylor, who died one day before Peter did. Highly committed to his career, he was deeply respected and admired by his peers. Attractive, lean and photogenic, his beauty was captured in many of the company photographs. He had impressive flexibility, and exhibited a very spiritual quality on stage. It shined through his face and aura. Dancers from his era remember him as "always working," a winner.

He will be dearly missed, especially by his ballet family at NYCB and SAB. They will love him forever. He was sixty-one at the time of his death.

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