Last year, participants in Dancewave's college audition were offered $3.4 million in scholarships. Photo by Linneah Anders, Courtesy Dancewave

These College Auditions Shelled Out Millions in Scholarships Last Year

Dancing in college is undoubtedly expensive, but these two events allow you to audition for scholarships from multiple programs at once.


Dancewave's Dancing Through College & Beyond

college scholarships Photo by Linneah Anders, Courtesy Dancewave

This fair's scholarship auditions give high school seniors exposure to college reps from across the country. In 2017, 65 percent of the participants were offered merit scholarships totaling $3.4 million. This year's expanded audition offerings, held at Hunter College in New York City, will accommodate up to 150 dancers. Participating schools include heavy hitters like Boston Conservatory at Berklee, New York University, The Juilliard School, University of Southern California and many more. October 13–14, 2018. For more information, visit dancewave.org/dtcb.

NYCDA Foundation College Scholarship Program

Photo by Evolve Photo Video, Courtesy NYCDA

As part of its NYC summer workshop, attendees who have just completed their junior or senior years of high school are eligible to participate in a day of college auditions. After evaluating dancers through ballet and contemporary classes, partner colleges and universities award four-year scholarships to select dancers. This year's awarding institutions included Point Park University, Southern Methodist University and The Hartt School. July 1, 2019. For more information, visit nycdance.com.

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Dance Magazine College Guide

Check out the 2018/19 edition of the Dance Magazine College Guide, available for purchase now.

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