Last year, participants in Dancewave's college audition were offered $3.4 million in scholarships. Photo by Linneah Anders, Courtesy Dancewave

These College Auditions Shelled Out Millions in Scholarships Last Year

Dancing in college is undoubtedly expensive, but these two events allow you to audition for scholarships from multiple programs at once.


Dancewave's Dancing Through College & Beyond

college scholarships Photo by Linneah Anders, Courtesy Dancewave

This fair's scholarship auditions give high school seniors exposure to college reps from across the country. In 2017, 65 percent of the participants were offered merit scholarships totaling $3.4 million. This year's expanded audition offerings, held at Hunter College in New York City, will accommodate up to 150 dancers. Participating schools include heavy hitters like Boston Conservatory at Berklee, New York University, The Juilliard School, University of Southern California and many more. October 13–14, 2018. For more information, visit dancewave.org/dtcb.

NYCDA Foundation College Scholarship Program

Photo by Evolve Photo Video, Courtesy NYCDA

As part of its NYC summer workshop, attendees who have just completed their junior or senior years of high school are eligible to participate in a day of college auditions. After evaluating dancers through ballet and contemporary classes, partner colleges and universities award four-year scholarships to select dancers. This year's awarding institutions included Point Park University, Southern Methodist University and The Hartt School. July 1, 2019. For more information, visit nycdance.com.

For more on dancing in college...

Dance Magazine College Guide

Check out the 2018/19 edition of the Dance Magazine College Guide, available for purchase now.

Latest Posts


Stark Photo Productions, Courtesy Harlequin

Why Your Barre Can Make or Break Your At-Home Dance Training

Throughout the pandemic, Shelby Williams, of Royal Ballet of Flanders (aka "Biscuit Ballerina"), has been sharing videos that capture the pitfalls of dancers working from home: slipping on linoleum, kicking over lamps and even taking windows apart at the "barre." "Dancers aren't known to be graceful all of the time," says Mandy Blackmon, PT, DPT, OSC, CMTPT, head physical therapist/medical director for Atlanta Ballet. "They tend to fall and trip."

Many dancers have tried to make their home spaces as safe as possible for class and rehearsal by setting up a piece of marley, like Harlequin's Dance Mat, to work on. But there's another element needed for taking thorough ballet classes at home: a portable barre.

"Using a barre is kinda Ballet 101," says 16-year-old Haley Dale, a student in her second year at American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School. She'd bought a portable barre from Harlequin to use at her parents' home in Northern Virginia even before the pandemic hit. "Before I got it, honestly I would stay away from doing barre work at home. Now I'm able to do it all the time."

Blackmon bought her 15-year-old stepdaughter a freestanding Professional Series Ballet Barre from Harlequin early on in quarantine. "I was worried about her injuring herself without one," she admits.

What exactly makes Harlequin's barres an at-home must-have, and hanging on to a chair or countertop so risky? Here are five major differences dancers will notice right away.

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS
December 2020