Dance in Pop Culture

Sergei Polunin Trades Dancewear in for Leather Pants in New Fashion Campaign

Sergei Polunin joins the models dubbed the Balmain Army for the fashion house's Fall/Winter 2018 campaign. Photo by An Le, via Instagram.

Joining all of the fashion month festivities is Sergei Polunin—but you won't catch him walking down the runway. The dancer- turned-actor is dipping his toes into the modeling world as part of the campaign for Balmain's Fall/Winter 2018 collection in designs by Olivier Rousteing (known for his embellished creations favored by celebrities like Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez).


Polunin moves with (surprising) ease in a pair of shiny leather pants in a video clip that was later combined with other shorts from the campaign. Also appearing in campaign stills, shot by An Le, Polunin keeps the shiny pants, but swaps the rest of his look for a more muted shirt and embellished jacket. And while the delightfully creepy campaign isn't like the dance-focused videos we're used to seeing Polunin pop up in, we're so excited to see another dancer starring in a major fashion campaign (remember Roberto Bolle's appearance in the Tod's Spring/Summer 2018 collection?).

Polunin's campaign with Balmain marks the second collaboration between the French fashion house and the ballet. Last summer, Rousteing generated buzz in the dance and fashion worlds when he designed the costumes for choreographer Sébastien Bertaud's piece for Paris Opéra Ballet, Renaissance. And we hope Polunin's new campaign means we can expect even more Balmain and ballet projects in the future.

The Conversation
Career Advice
Tony Testa leads a rehearsal during his USC New Movement Residency. Photo by Mary Mallaney/Courtesy USC

The massive scale of choreographing an Olympic opening ceremony really has no equivalent. The hundreds of performers, the deeply historic rituals and the worldwide audience and significance make it a project like no other.

Just consider the timeline: For most live TV events like award shows, choreographers usually take a month or two to put everything together. For the Olympics, the process can take up to four years.

But this kind of challenge is exactly what Los Angeles choreographer Tony Testa is looking for. He's currently creating a submission to throw his hat in the ring to choreograph for Beijing's 2022 Winter Games.

Keep reading... Show less
Cover Story
Photo by Jayme Thornton

In a studio high above Lincoln Center, Taylor Stanley is rehearsing a solo from Jerome Robbins' Opus 19/The Dreamer. As the pianist plays Prokofiev's plangent melody, Stanley begins to move, his arms forming crisp, clean lines while his upper body twists and melts from one position to the next.

All you see is intention and arrival, without a residue of superfluous movement. The ballet seems to depict a man searching for something, struggling against forces within himself. Stanley doesn't oversell the struggle—in fact he's quite low-key—but the clarity with which he executes the choreography draws you in.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox