10 Dancer Moods as Told Through Stock Photos

As Dance Magazine editors, we admittedly spend more time than we'd like sifting through stock photography. Some of it is good, more of it is bad and most of it is just plain awkward.

But when paired with the right caption, those shots magically transform from head-scratchers to meme-worthy images that illustrate our singular experience as dancers. You can thank the internet for this special salute to dancer moods.


"I found a street with low traffic—and rent is free!"

Kyle Head/Unsplash

Living that dry-shampoo life. 

Miguel Salgado/Unsplash

"If I did it once I can do it again..."

Liel Anapolsky/Unsplash

"My standing leg looks stunning, but you'll just have to imagine it."

arnie chou/Unsplash

Because sports psychology doesn't practice itself

Nihal Demirci/Unsplash

"Yes, Debra, I have tried spotting the corner."

Ahmad Odeh/Unsplash

"What? You think I'm being dramatic? I'll show you dramatic."

Yitzhak Rodriguez/Unsplash

We've all been that dancer in the red shirt. 

JackF/Getty Images

"Can I get an honorary doctorate for that?"

Artranq/Getty Images

Got an alternate caption idea? Tell us in the comments.

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Luke Isley, Courtesy Ballet West

How Do Choreographers Bring Something Fresh to Music We've Heard Over and Over?

In 2007, Oregon Ballet Theatre asked Nicolo Fonte to choreograph a ballet to Maurice Ravel's Boléro. "I said, 'No way. I'm not going near it,' " recalls Fonte. "I don't want to compete with the Béjart version, ice skaters or the movie 10. No, no, no!"

But Fonte's husband encouraged him to "just listen and get a visceral reaction." He did. And Bolero turned into one of Fonte's most requested and successful ballets.

Not all dance renditions of similar warhorse scores have worked out so well. Yet the irresistible siren song of pieces like Stravinsky's The Firebird and The Rite of Spring, as well as the perennial Carmina Burana by Carl Orff, seem too magnetic for choreographers to ignore.

And there are reasons for their popularity. Some were commissioned specifically for dance: Rite and Firebird for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes; Boléro for dance diva Ida Rubinstein's post–Ballets Russes troupe. Hypnotic rhythms (Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel) and danceable melodies (Bizet's Carmen) make a case for physical eye candy. Audience familiarity can also help box office receipts. Still, many choreographers have been sabotaged by the formidable nature and Muzak-y overuse of these iconic compositions.

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