Getty Images

Surgery for Better Flexibility? Not Worth It.

My artistic director suggested that I get surgery to fix my average flexibility if I want a company contract. Yet he casts me in nice roles even as an apprentice. I don't know what to do.

—Anonymous


Getting surgery to improve your flexibility does not work and would be a waste of your time and money. My advice is to meet with a dance medicine orthopedist. They can give you a prescription for physical therapy to work on your flexibility and provide you with a letter for your director explaining their approach.

The majority of your flexibility is out of your control and is due largely to the structure of your bones and elasticity of your muscle tissue. Other factors, like sex (females tend to be more flexible than males), age and warmer temperatures (which loosen you up), also affect your range of motion. You can improve your flexibility by a small degree through gentle, regular stretching.

Of course, if you don't feel that your director is looking out for your best interest, it might be time to audition for other companies. If he chose you to be an apprentice and perform choice roles, you must be talented.

Latest Posts


Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS