Career Advice
David Neumann's I Understand Everything Better. Photo by Maria Baranova, courtesy Neumann

Collaboration is a curious thing. For choreographers, it can open their practice to another set of eyes. It can allow their work to exist in a larger way. It can add serious heft to the final artistic product, with a signature all of its own.

But: There's an art to working in close communion with another artist, whether they're a designer or a composer. At the heart of the process is developing a rapport where each collaborator feels a sense of freedom within a set of given limits, where each understands what the other needs. Getting to that point takes some back and forth, trial and error, and several stabs in the dark.

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Breaking Stereotypes
Jermaine Terry working on fellow Ailey dancer Sarah Daley-Perdomo's dress while on tour in Frankfurt, Germany. Courtesy Terry

It's widely known how jam-packed an Ailey dancer's schedule is: the company averages between 175 and 200 performances each year. So it's hard to imagine that these artists have time for anything else.

Impressively, eight-year AAADT dancer Jermaine Terry has somehow maintained a second career in costume and clothing design. From wedding dresses to one-of-a kind evening gowns for Ailey galas, the self-taught designer is inspired by the challenge.

What He Has To Say: Terry gave Dance Magazine the scoop on how, in the words of Project Runway's Tim Gunn, he is able to "make it work."

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Career Advice
Bartelme and Jung compare colors. Photo by Michael Manata, courtesy Reid & Harriet

Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung were still students at the Fashion Institute of Technology when their first joint commission came along: Creating the costume for a Fall for Dance piece Andrea Miller choreographed on Drew Jacoby. The pair officially joined forces in 2011, forming their eponymous label and building a resumé that includes designing for American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet and Miami City Ballet. Reid & Harriet Design's success lies in their ability to mix bold colors and unique textures with an innate understanding of what dancers need to perform comfortably.

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