Rant & Rave
Dorfman in his Come, and Back Again. Ian Douglas, Courtesy Dorfman

I hate asking for money. I am tired of feeling like we, as dance practitioners, are constantly begging for every morsel of sustenance. We are often seen as the poor stepchildren of the arts, usually thought of as having nothing tangible to sell.

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Career Advice
Quinn Wharton

What does it take to "make it" in dance? It's no secret that turning this passion into a profession can be a struggle. In such a competitive field, talent alone isn't enough to get you where you want to be.

So what kinds of steps can you take to become successful? Dance Magazine spoke to 33 people from all corners of the industry to get their advice on the lessons that could help us all, no matter where we are in our careers.

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Dancers Trending
Photo by Brooke Lark via Unsplash

Happy New Year! Whether or not resolutions are your thing, I always find that a bit of wisdom from the people I admire is a great way to start the year. Here are some favorite nuggets from eight dancers, choreographers and directors who have appeared in our pages over the last year.

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What Wendy's Watching
David Dorfman Dance in Aroundtown, PC Adam Campos

David Dorfman's choreography asks, How can we all get along? In his new piece, Aroundtown at the BAM Harvey Theater, he shows how hostility within a community can turn to tenderness. He and his wife, Lisa Race, have a long embrace in the corner of the stage. It's almost like saying that enduring love doesn't always happen center stage.

In my 2013 "Choreography in Focus" with Dorfman, he says he likes his work to reflect "the mess of life." And you will see some of that mess in this piece, captured with compassion, craft and humor.

Aroundtown, which is part of the Next Wave Festival at Brooklyn Academy of Music, is at the BAM Harvey Theater from Nov. 8 to 11.

News
Hofesh Shechter's Grand Finale. Photo by Rahi Rezvani, Courtesy Danse Danse.

We are deep into the fall season, and the steady stream of great performances has yet to let up. Here are the shows we're keeping an eye on this month.

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Dancers Trending
Katrina Lenk and Tony Shalhoub in The Band's Visit. Photo by Ahron R. Foster

When Katrina Lenk says her feet never touched the ground in her Broadway debut, as a replacement in Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark, she's not telling you how deliriously happy she was—though she was.

Lenk is being literal: Playing Arachne, the show's magical spider-woman, she was suspended in a gigantic web throughout. Her ability to fly and enjoy it—crucial to landing the role—was honed with a summer job "swimming" over the heads of the audience at Universal Studios. "You just never know where random experiences are gonna take you," she says.

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Dancers Trending
Andy Blankenbuehler in a Bandstand reheasal. Photo by Rachel Papo

It's Broadway awards season, and tons of our favorite dancers and choreographers are getting big-time recognition.

The Tony Award nominations were announced yesterday and the Best Choreography finalists include:

Andy Blankenbuehler for Bandstand

Peter Darling and Ellen Kane for Groundhog Day

Kelly Devine for Come From Away

Denis Jones for Holiday Inn

Sam Pinkleton for Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812

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Dancers Trending
The cast of Indecent. Photo by Carol Rosegg, Courtesy Connecticut College.

Postmodern choreographer David Dorfman grew up watching experimental theater, so it makes sense that elements like text, abstract set design and socially conscious through-lines pepper his work. Choreographing for theater seems like a natural next step. The opening of Indecent on April 18 marks Dorfman's first outing as a Broadway choreographer. The play is about the making of God of Vengeance, a 1923 Broadway production based on a landmark Yiddish play, and deals with homosexuality and freedom of expression.

How did you get involved in Indecent?

I've known Rebecca Taichman, one of the creators, for 13 years or so now. We did a project together called Green Violin in Philadelphia.

What research went into choreographing this play?

I did more research for this than I normally do. Some of it is a bit tongue-in-cheek. In order to do that you have to get in deep about the hand gestures and rhythms of Hasidic dance. I don't believe that we have to produce a totally authentic version. But you have to know exactly where something comes from in order to stray.

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Dancers Trending
Photo by Jerry Dalia

It's mad-dash time on Broadway, as shows scramble to qualify for the June 11 Tony Awards. "It is a crazy season," says Andy Blankenbuehler, who won last year for choreographing Hamilton. And the 10 musicals arriving in the two months preceding the deadline, April 27, "are all over the map," he says. "So many different audiences will find a show to really be in love with."

One of them is his own, Bandstand, set in 1945 as GIs resume their lives after World War II. Working with composer Richard Oberacker and writer Robert Taylor, "Andy the Director" focused initially on "music, text, characters—establishing the world," he says, to tell the story of veterans forming a big band.

BandstandPhoto by Jerry Dalia

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