Dancers Trending
Eduardo Guerrero is currently touring the U.S. with Gaditanía, his first work utilizing multiple dancers. Photo by Paco Lobato, Courtesy Guerrero

With a contemporary air that exalts—rather than obscures—flamenco tradition, and a technique and stamina that boggle the mind, Eduardo Guerrero's professional trajectory has done nothing but skyrocket since being named one of Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" earlier this year. His 2017 solo Guerrero has toured widely, and he has created premieres for the Jerez Festival (Faro) and the 2018 Seville Flamenco Biennial (Sombra Efímera). In the midst of his seemingly unstoppable ascension, he's created Gaditanía, his first work utilizing a corps de ballet. Guerrero is currently touring the U.S. with this homage to Cadiz, the city of his birth.

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News
Compagnie Hervé KOUBI will perform Barbarian Nights at Fall for Dance. Photo by Pierangela Flisi, Courtesy New York City Center

As the fall performance season kicks into high gear, we've been cramming as much excellent dance on our calendars as possible. But if you're feeling overwhelmed by all the options, we've got you covered: From rare U.S. appearances by one of our 2018 "25 to Watch" to an autumn mainstay for New Yorkers, Romeo and Juliet to The Handmaid's Tale, here's what caught our eye.

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25 to Watch
Erica Lall and Leal Zielińska, two of our 2018 "25 to Watch." Photo by Nathan Sayers

By now, you're probably as obsessed with the artists on our 2018 "25 to Watch" list as we are. But how do we decide who makes it? One answer is: carefully. Another: It's a long, long process.

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25 to Watch
Photo by Luis Malibrán, Courtesy Guerrero

Eduardo Guerrero is flamenco in its richest current incarnation. The Cádiz-born 34-year-old crafted a solid career in the companies of some of Spain's most important dancers, including Eva Yerbabuena, Antonio Canales and Rocío Molina. However, his two solo shows, El callejón de los pecados ("Sin Alley") and Guerrero ("Warrior"), are what have brought Guerrero to the forefront of flamenco dance in Spain.

The latter production received the Audience Award at the 2017 Jerez Festival due in large part to Guerrero's astonishing endurance: Dancing for nearly an hour and a half straight, pausing only to change costumes (sometimes onstage), Guerrero tells the captivating story of his relationship with women. The archetypal roles of the mother, the lover and the friend, performed by three female singers, all demand a different emotional and physical response, allowing Guerrero to display a breathtaking array of movement that often pushes him to the perilous limits of human motion.

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