Health & Body
Eating healthy fats and a bounty of fruits and vegetables is smart. But what about cutting carbs? Photo by Brooke Lark/Unsplash

Although the ketogenic diet has been around since the 1920s as an epilepsy treatment for children, it's experiencing a new wave of popularity. Thanks in part to social media, where "healthy" keto-friendly recipe videos are going viral, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet is gaining ground. But is it safe for dancers?

We checked in with Rachel Fine, registered dietitian nutritionist and founder of To The Pointe Nutrition, to see what eating keto means for dancers.

Keep reading... Show less
Health & Body
10 minutes of midday sun could keep you out of the PT's office. Photo by Unsplash

File this under news that sounds too good to be true: A study published in last month's International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance found that one little nutrient—vitamin D—could improve dancers' strength and decrease their risk of injury.

Known as "the sunshine vitamin" because of our body's ability to produce it when exposed to sun, vitamin D has long been a sore point for dancers. Many have chronically low levels, most likely because of their restrictive diets and all the time they spend indoors in studios and theaters.

That's a serious risk: Our bodies need this vitamin to absorb calcium and keep our bones strong. Other studies have shown that a lack of D also correlates with a lack of muscle strength.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Training
IADMS is looking to honor someone who's made a substantial impact through teaching dance. Photo via Thinkstock

Great dance educators with smart, scientific teaching practices are invaluable to the dance field. How else could we create healthy, beautiful dancers?

The International Association of Dance Medicine and Science is looking to honor someone who's made a substantial impact through teaching with its annual Dance Educators Award—and the committee is asking for nominations.

Keep reading... Show less
Health & Body
How do you warmup? Photo by Jim Lafferty

For many dancers, a "warmup" consists of sitting on the floor stretching their legs in various positions. But this strategy only reduces your muscles' ability to work properly—it negatively affects your strength, endurance, balance and speed for up to an hour.

Save your flexibility training for the end of the day. Instead, follow a warmup that will actually help prevent injury and improve your body's performance.

According to the International Association of Dance Medicine and Science, a smart warmup has four parts: "a gentle pulse-raising section, a joint mobilization section, a muscle lengthening section and a strength/balance building section."

Keep reading... Show less
Advice for Dancers
Thinkstock

Why do I keep getting stress fractures? I menstruate normally, dance on a sprung floor and take calcium supplements to strengthen my bones. I also follow my orthopedist's instructions and did rehab after previous stress fractures. What's wrong with my body?

—Rose, Yonkers, NY

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Magazine Awards
Marika Molnar working with Ana Sophia Scheller. Photo by Rachel Papo for Dance Teacher

Since George Balanchine first asked her to care for his dancers in the 1980s, Marika Molnar has helped heal icons as varied as Merce Cunningham, Trisha Brown, Natalia Makarova, Judith Jamison, Twyla Tharp, Chita Rivera and Mikhail Baryshnikov. Some patients call her their guardian angel.

"Marika has always answered all my (sometimes ridiculous) questions with the patience and respect that can only come from a deep love of us patients and what we do," says New York City Ballet principal Ashley Bouder. "Without her help during and after my pregnancy, I would never have been able to come back to the stage at full capacity."

Keep reading... Show less
Advice for Dancers
Stock Snap

I thought I'd be fine after undergoing successful surgery to repair a torn ankle ligament. Instead, I'm depressed and hopeless that I'm still not able to perform. My therapist tells me I'm making good progress, but I don't see it. Why not?

—Ashley, San Francisco, CA

Keep reading... Show less
Advice for Dancers
Pixabay

Three small dance companies offered me a job. The first wanted to give me good roles without pay until someone left. The second (which I took) pays, although the rep isn't as good and the studios are in a mall! The last was just a Nutcracker season in a nice company. Sadly, it feels like I "settled" for money rather than artistry. Did I make the right choice?

—Depressed Dancer, Midwest

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers Trending
Courtesy IADMS

The International Association for Dance Medicine & Science offers cutting-edge research, education and training to enhance dancers' health on a global stage. An annual conference by medical and dance professionals from 35 countries covers the latest advances in this specialty. Attendance is diverse, as more dancers enter the field. Anyone can download resource papers on topics like proper stretching and dancer nutrition from iadms.org.

Read the rest of Dance Magazine's list of the most influential people in dance today.

Advice for Dancers
Liza Voll

My doctor wants me to get a sonogram-guided injection of cortisone to reduce the inflammation surrounding my os trigonum, a pea-sized extra bone in the back of my ankle. I'm relieved that surgery may not be necessary, but I'm afraid of the steroid. My friend ruptured his tendon after getting an injection. Am I doing something risky?

—Alison, Cincinnati, OH

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox