News
Boston Ballet in Forsythe's Pas/Parts 2018. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy Boston Ballet

A feast of Forsythe, a surfeit of Dorrance Dance, a challenge to how we perceive refugees. Our editors' performance picks this month run the gamut.

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Popular
In 2005, Michelle Dorrance was an artist "On the Rise" in Dance Magazine. Photo by Jayme Thornton.

Each month at Dance Magazine, we zero in on budding talent in our "On the Rise" department. Our writers across the country and beyond are continually on the lookout for the dancers and choreographers who are bound to be majors names in the years to come.

With 2018 coming to a close, what better time to check in with some of our former "On the Rise" artists? We hate to say we told you so, but these dancers—like Michelle Dorrance and Sara Mearns—have since hit it big.

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News
Xenos, Akram Khan's final full-length solo, is an ode to the soldiers of World War I. Photo by Nicol Vizioli, Courtesy Sadler's Wells

We might have gotten a little bit carried away with this year's "Season Preview"—but with the 2018–19 season packing so many buzzy shows, how could we not? Here are over two dozen tours, premieres and revivals that have us drooling.

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Breaking Stereotypes
Michelle Dorrance creating on ABT, with rehearsal assistants Christine Flores and Olivia Maggi. Photo by Jim Lafferty

"Don't look at the mirror, look at your feet," Michelle Dorrance corrects. Smiling at the counterintuitive suggestion, Gillian Murphy, Devon Teuscher and Christine Shevchenko—American Ballet Theatre principals accustomed to projecting up and out to opera house balconies—look down at their pointe shoes as they shuffle into a line of tight fifth positions.

As polyrhythmic strains of music fill ABT's studios, the trio flashes through small, quicksilver position changes while Teuscher quietly counts a steady 4/4 beat that isn't yet audible in the music. Rapid-fire tendus take on an attack usually reserved for frappés, accom-panied by the sound of boxes purposefully striking the floor. ("The shape can exist a split-second before the note—it's like in tap, the motion has to happen early for the sound to be on time," Dorrance advised before the run.)

When they finish the section without stopping or kicking one another, Murphy smiles ruefully and says, "I need to get louder shoes."

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