Style & Beauty
Meaghan Grace Hinkis in 'The Nutcracker.' Photo by Bill Cooper, courtesy of The Royal Ballet

Sprinkled in among Royal Ballet soloist Meaghan Grace Hinkis' performance shots on Instagram are some seriously stunning close-up pictures of her corresponding beauty looks. From chiseled cheekbones to gold-dusted wigs, Hinkis fully embraces her ballet beauty routine. "I love doing stage makeup," she says. "It's fun to change up the look depending on the role I'm playing."


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Health & Body
Via Instagram

When you spend as much time on the road as The Royal Ballet's Steven McRae, getting access to a proper gym can be a hassle. To stay fit, the Australian-born principal turns to calisthenics—the old-school art of developing aerobic ability and strength with little to no equipment.

"It's basically just using your own body weight," McRae explains. "In terms of partnering, I'm not going to dance with a ballerina who is bigger than me, so if I can sustain my own body weight, then in my head I should be fine."

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Dance in Pop Culture
Oleg Ivenko and Ralph Fiennes on the set of The White Crow, an upcoming feature film dramatizing Rudolf Nureyev's defection. Photo via variety.com

Oh, Hollywood. In any given year, Tinseltown's use of dance in film veers from the woefully disappointing to the surprisingly delightful, but one thing's for certain: It's rarely boring. Here's our not-at-all-comprehensive and completely-subject-to-change list of the new dance-related movies coming soon to a theater (or laptop screen) near you.

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Dancers Trending
Xander Parish at Mariinsky Theatre. PC Venetia Dearden

A kindhearted British bloke with feet that ballerinas would envy, Xander Parish isn't a self-promoting celebrity or a social media whiz. He is more like your next-door neighbor, but with one caveat: He has loads of talent. His elastic muscles boast an endless plié that creates soundless jumps and textbook-perfect lines. Combine that with strong partnering skills and polished dramatic delivery, and Parish's slow rise to fame as a Mariinsky Ballet principal has at long last earned him well-deserved recognition.


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Dancers Trending
Pina Bausch's The Rite of Spring. Photo by Oliver Look, Courtesy Brooklyn Academy of Music.

On the cusp of a new performance season, our calendars are chock full with shows we're dying to see. But it can be hard to know where to start with a season filled to bursting with promising premieres, tours and revivals. We've picked 12 shows that should definitely be on your radar.

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Popular
Photo by Zoran Velijkovic, Courtesy DM Archives.

In the June 1967 issue of Dance Magazine, a young Anthony Dowell told us why he relished the challenges of The Royal Ballet's then-regular U.S. tours: "Dancing as frequently as we do here gives met he opportunity to build my stamina and to continue work on my roles." At 24, Dowell was already a premier danseur and had originated the roles of Oberon in Frederick Ashton's The Dream and Benvolio in Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet. His work ethic, elegant lines and chameleonic ability to adapt to vastly different choreographic styles led to a storied career with The Royal Ballet, which he would direct from 1986–2001.

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Career Advice
The Royal's new breakout stars: Naghdi and Matthew Ball in Romeo & Juliet. Alice Pennefather, Courtesy ROH

Last fall, Yasmine Naghdi's debut as Juliet was an instant sensation in London. Hers was a raw, touchingly youthful account of the role. With effortless technique and musicality, she allowed Kenneth MacMillan's steps to sing. Of Persian and Belgian descent, the British first soloist, who joined The Royal Ballet in 2010, is now establishing herself as a lyrical ballerina to be reckoned with, and a proud representative of the British school.

Company: The Royal Ballet

Age: 24

Hometown: London, England

Training: The Royal Ballet School (White Lodge and Upper School)

Accolades: 2009 Young British Dancer of the Year

Breakout moment: Naghdi's first principal role was Olga, Tatiana's carefree sister, in John Cranko's Onegin in 2013. When she reprised it in 2015 with Natalia Osipova as Tatiana, director Kevin O'Hare noticed how much she'd grown, and deemed her ready to dance Juliet. “She really brought Olga to life," he says. “It's easy to get lost alongside Tatiana, but they were equals."

MacMillan heroine: With Matthew Ball, another young British talent, as her Romeo, Naghdi proved a natural as Juliet. “We were both starting from scratch, and I think that helped our bond," says Naghdi. “I like to think of acting more as being, because if you force it, the audience can see that. With Juliet, I felt like I was living onstage as her."

Generation change: Along with Ball, Francesca Hayward and a few others, Naghdi is part of an outstanding UK–trained generation that is challenging the notion that British dancers are too timid. Onstage, she draws the eye with her calm self-possession. “We're quiet fighters—not brash, but quietly working on what we need to do, and then when it's time, really showing what we can do," Naghdi says.

Queen of the Brits: In addition to the MacMillan and Frederick Ashton repertoire, Naghdi is thriving in works by The Royal Ballet's trio of in-house choreographers: Wayne McGregor, Christopher Wheeldon and Liam Scarlett. “To work with these three face-to-face, you feel like you're making history."

What she's working on: “I'm more of an adagio dancer, so I've had to work on my petite batterie."

What Kevin O'Hare is saying: “She is nicely ambitious—she knows what she wants, and she's a sponge in the studio. She's not going to waste an opportunity."

A trained ear: Naghdi also sings, plays the piano and composes her own music. “It helps with breathing, musicality and to understand musical scores and phrasing. I don't like to count—if there is an opportunity to just trust the music, I will."

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