Career Advice
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Many dancers would rather do just about anything than spend time on their finances. They procrastinate when it comes to recording their income and expenses, and put off investing for another day. As artists, we would rather be in the studio. But looking after your financial health can actually lead to more artistic freedom.

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Career Advice
Photo via Unsplash

Never did I think I'd see the day when I'd outgrow dance. Sure, I knew my life would have to evolve. In fact, my dance career had already taken me through seasons of being a performer, a choreographer, a business owner and even a dance professor. Evolution was a given. Evolving past dancing for a living, however, was not.

Transitioning from a dance career involved just as much of a process as building one did. But after I overcame the initial identity crisis, I realized that my dance career had helped me develop strengths that could be put to use in other careers. For instance, my work as a dance professor allowed me to discover my knack for connecting with students and helping them with their careers, skills that ultimately opened the door for a pivot into college career services.

Here's how five dance skills can land you a new job—and help you thrive in it:

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Career Advice
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When dancers are unhappy or uncomfortable in the studio, healthy communication is essential. Perhaps you feel slighted by a casting decision, dissatisfied with a new rehearsal schedule or uneasy about something a choreographer has asked you to do.

What can you do? Here are three strategies to keep in mind.

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Advice for Dancers
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My noisy roommates are driving me crazy, but I can't handle the cost of an apartment on my own. I'm trying to make money by catering between dance classes and performing. I'm also looking into babysitting. Do you have any other ideas about how I can move out?

—Tom, New York, NY

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Career Advice

Getting fired isn't pretty, but it happens. And no matter the reason, there are ways to rebuild your dance career. But don't be caught off guard by these potential repercussions from losing your job:

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Advice for Dancers
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I plan on moving to New York City this fall to continue my training and freelance work as a dancer/choreographer. A big concern is whether my health insurance will cover my medical needs for asthma. Can you give me any recommendations?

—Casey, San Francisco, CA

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Dancers Trending

For Dance Magazine's 90th anniversary issue, we wanted to celebrate the movers, shakers and changemakers who are having the biggest impact on our field right now. There were so many to choose from! But with the help of dozens of writers, artists and administrators working in dance, the Dance Magazine staff whittled the list down to those we felt are making the most difference right now.

Click through the links below to find out why they made our list.

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Dancers Trending
Joann Coates, Courtesy The Actors Fund

Got a problem? The Actors Fund can likely help. Many of the services it provides online or through its offices in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles are completely free:

• health insurance counseling

• primary and specialty medical care and referrals through the new Friedman Health Center for the Performing Arts in Times Square

• guidance overcoming injuries through The Dancers' Resource

• career counseling and scholarships through Career Transition For Dancers

• financial education, plus assistance for artists in crisis

• affordable housing options, including residences operated by The Actors Fund

Read the rest of Dance Magazine's list of the most influential people in dance today.

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