Tanaquil Le Clercq in 1953. Photo Courtesy DM Archives.

#tbt: Tanny Le Clercq, and Balanchine's Musings on Mortality

In the October 1957 issue of Dance Magazine, we received the latest updates on New York City Ballet dancer Tanaquil Le Clercq's health nearly a year after her polio diagnosis. Le Clercq, who at the time was George Balanchine's wife and muse, had become immobile from the waist down and was taken to a rehabilitation center in Warm Springs, Georgia. Balanchine told us that "Tanny" was keeping her humor and grace through her suffering, adding, "People too often think only of the future, always making plans for what they'd like to do someday. How do they know what's going to be tomorrow? Why not think of the present?" Although Le Clercq never danced again, she didn't let polio shatter her passion for dance. She spent the rest of her life teaching at Dance Theatre of Harlem with the same loving light that she was adored for onstage.

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Inside one of Interlochen's brand-new dance studios. Courtesy Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen’s New Breathtaking Dance Center Is Ready for Class

After months of practicing in a cramped space at home, young dancers have dreamed of training in a spacious, airy studio. And when the facilities are as resplendent as the brand-new dance center at Michigan's Interlochen Center for the Arts, everyday technique class is to be savored.

The recently renovated and vastly expanded 26,000-square-foot Dance Center at Interlochen is now a world-class facility on par with those of premier conservatories and professional companies. Joseph Morrissey, Interlochen's director of dance, says a lot of careful thought went into the architecture: "This could not just be a building that dance is going to go into. This is a building that is made for dance." To build the best facilities for his students, Morrissey sought out Flansburgh Architects, the group behind the beautiful Perles Family Studio at Jacob's Pillow.

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July 2021