The 2013 Princess Grace Award winners

Here at Dance Magazine, we've always got emerging talent on the brain (our "25 to Watch," published every January, is coming together as we speak). Another way that early-career artists receive much-deserved recognition are the prestigious Princess Grace Awards, which were announced today. For 2013, the dancers and choreographers who have been recognized with scholarships and fellowships are Alexander L. Anderson (The Juilliard School), Skylar Brandt (American Ballet Theatre), Courtney A. Henry (Alonzo King LINES Ballet), Talli Jackson (Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company), and Rachelle Anaïs Scott (Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet). Three choreographers have received fellowships at specific companies: Rosie Herrera at Ballet Hispanico, Loni Landon at BODYTRAFFIC, and Robyn Mineko Williams at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago.

In addition, special project awards recognize choreographers Eric Kupers and Zoe Scofield, a works-in-progress residency has been awarded to Camille A. Brown, and a choreography mentorship co-commission award goes to Alex Ketley at the Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography (MANCC).

And finally Tiler Peck. Is there anything this eminently musical and stylish ballerina can't do? Peck, a Princess Grace awardee in 2004, will receive the 2013 Princess Grace Statue Award, given to past winners who have "distinguish[ed] themselves in their artistic disciplines" since their initial award (Peck received hers in 2004)—and which comes with a cool $25,000. The awards in total amount to more than $1 million.

The 2013 Princess Grace Awards, which recognize promising artists in the fields of theater, dance, and film, will be held on October 30 in New York City.

Broadway
Amber Gray and Patrick Page. Photo by Matthew Murphy, Courtesy Hadestown

There's a rare moment in Broadway's Hadestown where the audience is able to breathe a sigh of relief. The smash-hit success is not well-known for being light-hearted or easy-going; Hadestown is a show full of workers and walls and, well, the second act largely takes place in a slightly modernized version of hell.

But deep into the second act, the show reaches a brief homeostasis of peace, one of those bright, shining moments that allows the audience to think "maybe it will turn out this time," as the character Hermes keeps suggesting.

After songs and songs of conflict and resentment, Hades, the king of the underground, and his wife, the goddess Persephone, rekindle their love. And, unexpectedly, they dance. It's one of the most compelling moments in the show.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored by NYCDA
Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell teaching an Ailey Workshop at NYCDA. Courtesy NYCDA

Back in 2011 when Joe Lanteri first approached Katie Langan, chair of Marymount Manhattan College's dance department, about getting involved with New York City Dance Alliance, she was skeptical about the convention/competition world.

"But I was pleasantly surprised by the enormity of talent that was there," she says. "His goal was to start scholarship opportunities, and I said okay, I'm in."

Today, it's fair to say that Lanteri has far surpassed his goal of creating scholarship opportunities. But NYCDA has done so much more, bridging the gap between the convention world and the professional world by forging a wealth of partnerships with dance institutions from Marymount to The Ailey School to Complexions Contemporary Ballet and many more. There's a reason these companies and schools—some of whom otherwise may not see themselves as aligned with the convention/competition world—keep deepening their relationships with NYCDA.

Now, college scholarships are just one of many ways NYCDA has gone beyond the typical weekend-long convention experience and created life-changing opportunities for students. We rounded up some of the most notable ones:

Keep reading... Show less
News
Amber Star Merkens, Courtesy Mark Morris Dance Group

There's always been something larger than life about choreographer Mark Morris. Of course, there are the more than 150 works he's made and that incisive musicality that makes dance critics drool. But there's also his idiosyncratic, no-apologies-offered personality, and his biting, no-holds-barred wit. And, well, his plan to keep debuting new dances even after he's dead.

So it should come as little surprise that his latest distinction is also a bit larger than life: The New York Landmarks Conservancy is adding Morris to its list of "Living Landmarks."

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored by Harlequin Floors
Left: Hurricane Harvey damage in Houston Ballet's Dance Lab; Courtesy Harlequin. Right: The Dance Lab pre-Harvey; Nic Lehoux, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

"The show must go on" may be a platitude we use to get through everything from costume malfunctions to stormy moods. But when it came to overcoming a literal hurricane, Houston Ballet was buoyed by this mantra to go from devastated to dancing in a matter of weeks—with the help of Harlequin Floors, Houston Ballet's longstanding partner who sprang into action to build new floors in record time.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox