American Ballet Theatre's Kathryn Boren, featured in Ballerina Project.

Dane Shitagi, Courtesy Chronicle Books

The New Ballerina Project Book is Finally Here!

Earlier this year, we shared that photographer Dane Shitagi's Ballerina Project—his gorgeous, ongoing collection of dance photos that have dominated our Instagram feeds for years—would be coming to an end. But all is not lost—starting September 17, you can enjoy over 170 of these photographs in Ballerina Project, a stunning new book showcasing Shitagi's work.


Courtesy Chronicle Books

For 18 years, Shitagi photographed hundreds of ballet dancers in locations all over the world—streets, beaches, rooftops, you name it. (I'm biased, but one of my favorites is this image of my friend Violeta Angelova, hanging gracefully from Brooklyn's Williamsburg Bridge.) His work became a viral phenomenon on social media, where he has over a million followers in Instagram. His new book features over 50 renowned ballet dancers, with major cities like New York City, London, Buenos Aires and Paris serving as their backdrop.

Julie Doherty poses on the beach, from the book Ballerina Project.

Dane Shitagi, Courtesy Chronicle Books

So clear a space on your coffee table! This hardcover book is even bound in pink satin, a nod to pointe shoes. You'll be able to purchase Ballerina Project, currently available for pre-order, at book stores nationwide on September 17, including major retailers like Barnes and Noble, Amazon and Target. And New York City dancers, listen up: To celebrate its release, Rizzoli Bookstore is having a launch party on Sunday, September 15. Fans will be able to meet and get their books signed by some of Ballerina Project's featured dancers, including American Ballet Theatre's Isabella Boylston, Kathryn Boren and Brittany DeGrofft and High Strung Free Dance star Juliet Doherty. Click here for more information about this free event.

Latest Posts


Getty Images

How Do You Make a Theater Safe Again?

Last summer, months before the word "coronavirus" became part of our daily lexicon, American Repertory Theater artistic director Diane Paulus started working with an unexpected expert: Joseph Allen, an assistant professor of exposure assessment science at Harvard's H.T. Chan School of Public Health and head of the university's Healthy Buildings Program. According to Boston Magazine, Paulus was starting to plan out A.R.T.'s new venue at Harvard, and wanted to design a "healthy" theater.

So when COVID-19 began shutting everything down, the team had already put in months of work considering how to make a performing arts venue safe. To share their ideas with other theaters, A.R.T. published a blueprint online that will be continually updated. Although the "Roadmap for Recovery and Resilience for Theater" is not meant to be comprehensive or prescriptive, it offers several insightful factors to consider:

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS