Dance Training

The Best Online Dance Training Platforms You Can Try At Home

Tiler Peck teaching a CLI class. Photo by Quinn Wharton, courtesy CLI

Whether you're learning a new style, warming up for a performance or just want to take class when you can't make it to the studio, online dance training platforms are an ever-growing option for dancers of all genres and skill levels. And though they should never replace your live training, they can be a convenient—and hopefully valuable—supplement. Here are the best options available today:


CLI Studios

clistudios.com

Cost: Starts at $100/month

Who it's for: Studio owners and dance teachers, to share with their students

What makes it unique: Big-name teachers, like "So You Think You Can Dance" favorites Nick Lazzarini, Allison Holker and tWitch, with classes in genres like contemporary, jazz and hip hop as well as choreography services

DancePlug

danceplug.com

Cost: $29/month, or 3-, 6- and 12-month access packages for $80–$298

Who it's for: Students and teachers

What makes it unique: Classes include hip hop, ballet and Bollywood, plus an audition plan subscription for $9.50/month or $96/year.

Dancio

dancio.com

Cost: Rent individual classes for a 48-hour period, starting at $3.99

Who it's for: Students, professionals and teachers

What makes it unique: Dancio is currently exclusively focused on ballet, with the chance to take class from stars like American Ballet Theatre's Carlos Lopez and New York City Ballet's Craig Hall and Lauren King.

Learntodance.com

learntodance.com

Cost: À la carte dance courses and multipart modules range from $37–$147

Who it's for: Beginner to intermediate students

What makes it unique: A range of social dance styles, like ballroom, salsa and club dancing

Operation: Tap

operationtap.com

Cost: $15–$40/month

Who it's for: Students, teachers and enthusiasts

What makes it unique: OPTAP is devoted specifically to tap dance.

STEEZY

steezy.co

Cost: $19.99/month or $199.99/year

Who it's for: Students and teachers

What makes it unique: Urban dance styles, like hip hop, whacking, house, popping and krump

The Creative Process
A Ladies of Hip-Hop battle. Photo by Loreto Jamlig, Courtesy Ladies of Hip-Hop

Michele Byrd-McPhee's uncle was a DJ for the local black radio station in Philadelphia, where she was born. As a kid she was always dancing to the latest music, including a new form of powerful poetry laid over pulsing beats that was the beginning of what we now call hip hop.

Byrd-McPhee became enamored of the form and went on to a career as a hip-hop dancer and choreographer, eventually founding the Ladies of Hip-Hop Festival and directing the New York City chapter of Everybody Dance Now!. Over the decades, she has experienced hip hop's growth from its roots in the black community into a global phenomenon—a trajectory she views with both pride and caution.

On one hand, the popularity of hip hop has "made a global impact," says Byrd-McPhee. "It's provided a voice for so many people around the world." The downside is "it's used globally in ways that the people who made the culture don't benefit from it."

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Rena Most at work backstage. Photo courtesy ABT

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