Your Ultimate Guide to Taking Class At Home

Harlequin Floors' home studio kit lets dancers bring the studio home with them. Image courtesy Harlequin Floors

So you're on layoff—or, let's be real, you just don't feel like going to the studio—and you decide you're going to take class from home. Easy enough, right? All you need is an empty room and some music tracks on your iPhone, right?

Wrong. Anyone who has attempted this feat can tell you that taking class at home—or even just giving yourself class in general—is easier said than done. But with the right tools, it's totally doable—and can be totally rewarding.


Get the Right Floor

Carpet: no. Proper dance floor: yes. Image courtesy Harlequin Floors

We all know by now that dancing on improper flooring can result in serious injury. But even if you're just doing barre, the carpet or hardwood floor in your home won't properly replicate what it feels like to be in the studio. Harlequin Floor's home studio kits include a sprung floor to protect your joints as well as a variety of cover surfaces to choose from.

Warm Up

Save stretching for after class. Photo by Matthew Henry via stocksnap.io

Just because you're not at the studio doesn't mean you can skip warming up. Before you do any demanding movement, be sure to get your heart rate up and your blood flowing—whether that's through ab work, light cardio or whatever fits best into your practice. Remember: Stretching is not warming up, and should be left for after you've finished dancing. (Couldn't hurt to throw in a foam rolling session, either!)

Make A Plan

Plan out your class before you dive in. Photo via Unsplash

If you're used to taking class from someone else, it can feel daunting when you have to train yourself. Before starting class, come up with a gameplan: Map out each of the combinations you plan to do, including the number of repetitions. Better yet, bring a teacher to you by using one of the many online dance training platforms available.

Grab A Barre

Image via us.harlequinfloors.com

Nope, the wall won't work. Sorry. (Seriously though, anatomically speaking, bracing yourself on a wall just isn't the same and can throw off your alignment.) Harlequin makes lightweight freestanding ballet barres you can set up anywhere, with adjustable feet for stability, no matter how uneven the floor.

Stay Focused

Maintain the same level of focus you would have if you were surrounded by your peers. Photo via Unsplash

​When you're in your home—and not surrounded by a teacher and peers to hold you accountable—it's easy to get distracted. Unless you're using it for music, place your phone in another room, and try to clear out as much clutter as possible. Find ways to make class fun—by choosing combinations you love, or setting goals you can feel good about achieving—to help incentivize you to stay on track.

Spice Things Up

Dancing at home can be an opportunity to try things you wouldn't normally do in the studio. For instance, use a Harlequin turning board to practice proper alignment in your turns. The board is also a great portable option for tap dancers on the go.

The Conversation
Rant & Rave

I was on my favorite treadmill when it happened.

My best running buddy was on my left. To my right, a total stranger with whom I'd suddenly become competitive. As the 15-person group headed into a two-minute push, the instructor got hyped, and the remix blasting Rihanna's "We Found Love" transitioned to "Smooth Criminal."

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Advice for Dancers
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I caught a bug that's going around and have a runny nose, cough, sore throat and no energy. Is this a cold or the flu? I want to dance but wonder if performing is a smart idea. Any advice?

—Achoo!, Brooklyn, NY

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