Michelle Williams as Gwen Verdon and Sam Rockwell as Bob Fosse. Photo by Pari Dukovic, Courtesy FX

How Many Iconic Fosse Numbers Can You Spot in the "Fosse/Verdon" Trailer?

To say that we're excited about "Fosse/Verdon" might be understating things a bit. The new limited series charting the romantic and creative partnership of Bob Fosse (played by Sam Rockwell) and Gwen Verdon (Michelle Williams) was announced last summer. And, with Bob and Gwen's daughter Nicole Fosse on board as co-executive producer and creative consultant, alongside most of the Hamilton dream team (with Andy Blankenbuehler on choreography), we've had high hopes for its verisimilitude.


FX finally released the first official trailer for the show today, and it was definitely worth the wait. It's packed with rehearsals and performances, press calls and private moments—not to mention heaps of drama and dancing. We won't even try to name all of the iconic numbers referenced in the two-minute trailer, but Fosse's idiosyncratic movement style is threaded throughout. ("Slouch. I don't think I've ever heard that word from a choreographer before," Verdon observes wryly.)

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Paulo Arrais rehearsing Agon with Lia Cirio. Photo by Brooke Trisolini

Fear of Reinjury Could Make You More Prone to Hurting Yourself Again. Here's How to Avoid It

It was Boston Ballet's first full run-through of its upcoming show, Kylián/Wings of Wax. As he prepared with a plié for a big saut de basque, principal dancer Paulo Arrais, 32, heard a Velcro-like sound and suddenly fell to the floor. He went into a state of shock, hyperventilating and feeling intense pressure on his knee. It turned out to be a full patellar tendon rupture, requiring surgery and an entire year off before he could return to the company.

Though his physical condition continues to improve, Arrais' mental recovery has also been challenging. "Treating your mind is just as important as treating your body," he says.

Feeling safe when returning to the studio can be tricky for any dancer. Some researchers believe a fear of reinjury can actually make athletes more prone to hurting themselves again. We talked to several medical professionals to understand why that might happen and what dancers can do to overcome that anxiety.

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