Advice for Dancers

A Quick Vacation Can't Always Save Dancers From Burnout. Here's Why

Stock Snap

I injured my foot in class after 10 relaxing days on the beach. I thought vacations were the way to deal with burnout. What am I missing?

—Confused, New York, NY


While you just took some time off, burnout requires at least three weeks of downtime to correct the imbalances between intense exercise and recovery. Unfortunately, the increased demands on dancers year-round make it tough to schedule sufficient time for rest periods. What can you do?

First, be aware that many dancers are perfectionists, making them especially prone to burnout. Symptoms include constant fatigue, upper respiratory infections and recurring injuries. You may also feel as though you're working harder and harder but achieving less.

Because burnout has both physical and emotional impacts, it is not something you can push through. According to research published in the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, dancers who take three to five weeks off actually see an increase in their strength, power, endurance and flexibility as they slowly get back in shape. Those who have shorter breaks are more likely to develop a second case of burnout within the first weeks or early months of returning to dancing, and they face a higher risk of injury.

Still, you can help prevent further burnout now by easing back into dance with physical therapy, cross-training and easy technique classes. Take one day off each week to let your body recover. Scheduling 15-minute breaks throughout the day, eating right, getting regular massages and sleeping nine or more hours a night will also reduce the stresses that lead to fatigue and injuries. You'll gain a competitive edge without overworking—a win-win situation.

News
Rauf "RubberlLegz" Yasit and Parvaneh Scharafali. Photo by Mohamed Sadek, courtesy The Shed

William Forsythe is bringing his multi-faceted genius to New York City in stripped down form. His "Quiet Evening of Dance," a mix of new and recycled work now at The Shed until October 25, is co-commissioned with Sadler's Wells in London (and a slew of European presenters).

As always, Forsythe's choreography is a layered experience, both kinetic and intellectual. This North American premiere prompted many thoughts, which I whittled down to seven.

Keep reading... Show less
News
Courtesy NBC

"Law & Order: SVU" has dominated the crime show genre for 21 seasons with its famous "ripped from the headlines" strategy of taking plot inspiration from real-life crimes.

So viewers would be forgiven for assuming that the new storyline following the son of Mariska Hargitay's character into dance class originated in the news cycle. After all, the mainstream media widely covered the reaction to Lara Spencer's faux pas on "Good Morning America" in August, when she made fun of Prince George for taking ballet class.

But it turns out, the storyline was actually the idea of the 9-year-old actor, Ryan Buggle, who plays Hargitay's son. And he came up with it before Spencer ever giggled at the word ballet.

Keep reading... Show less
Breaking Stereotypes
Getty Images

As a dietitian specializing in dance nutrition, the most common DM flooding my inbox is "How can I drop pounds (specifically from body fat) and gain muscle?"

The short answer? Not happening.

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers Trending
Chantelle Pianetta competing at a West Coast swing event. Courtesy Pianetta.

Just hearing the word "improvisation" is enough to make some ballet dancers shake in their pointe shoes. But for Chantelle Pianetta, it's a practice she relishes. Depending on the weekend, you might find her gracing Bay Area stages as a principal with Menlowe Ballet or sweeping in awards at West Coast swing competitions.

She specializes in Jack and Jill events, which involve improvised swing dancing with an unexpected partner in front of a panel of judges. (Check her out in action below.) While sustaining her ballet career, over the past four years Pianetta has quickly risen from novice to champion level on the WCS international competition circuit.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox