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A Quick Vacation Can't Always Save Dancers From Burnout. Here's Why

I injured my foot in class after 10 relaxing days on the beach. I thought vacations were the way to deal with burnout. What am I missing?

—Confused, New York, NY


While you just took some time off, burnout requires at least three weeks of downtime to correct the imbalances between intense exercise and recovery. Unfortunately, the increased demands on dancers year-round make it tough to schedule sufficient time for rest periods. What can you do?

First, be aware that many dancers are perfectionists, making them especially prone to burnout. Symptoms include constant fatigue, upper respiratory infections and recurring injuries. You may also feel as though you're working harder and harder but achieving less.

Because burnout has both physical and emotional impacts, it is not something you can push through. According to research published in the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, dancers who take three to five weeks off actually see an increase in their strength, power, endurance and flexibility as they slowly get back in shape. Those who have shorter breaks are more likely to develop a second case of burnout within the first weeks or early months of returning to dancing, and they face a higher risk of injury.

Still, you can help prevent further burnout now by easing back into dance with physical therapy, cross-training and easy technique classes. Take one day off each week to let your body recover. Scheduling 15-minute breaks throughout the day, eating right, getting regular massages and sleeping nine or more hours a night will also reduce the stresses that lead to fatigue and injuries. You'll gain a competitive edge without overworking—a win-win situation.

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Clockwise from top left: Photo by Loreto Jamlig, Courtesy Ladies of Hip-Hop; Wikimedia Commons; Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, Courtesy Pennsylvania Ballet; Natasha Razina, Courtesy State Academic Mariinsky Theatre; Photo by Will Mayer for Better Half Productions, Courtesy ABT

The 10 Biggest Dance Stories of 2019

What were the dance moments that defined 2019? The stories that kept us talking, week after week? According to our top-clicked articles of the year, they ranged from explorations of dance medicine and dance history, takedowns of Lara Spencer and companies who still charge dancers to audition, and, of course, our list of expert tips on how to succeed in dance today.

We compiled our 10 biggest hits of the year, and broke down why we think they struck a chord:

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I Am a Black Dancer Who Was Dressed Up in Blackface to Perform in La Bayadère

On Instagram this week, Misty Copeland reposted a picture of two Russian ballerinas covered head to toe in black, exposing the Bolshoi's practice of using blackface in the classical ballet La Bayadère. The post has already received over 60,000 likes and 2,000 comments, starting a long overdue conversation.

Comments have been pouring in from every angle imaginable: from history lessons on black face, to people outside of the ballet world expressing disbelief that this happens in 2019, to castigations of Copeland for exposing these young girls to the line of fire for what is ultimately the Bolshoi's costuming choice, to the accusations that the girls—no matter their cultural competence—should have known better.

I am a black dancer, and in 2003, when I was 11 years old, I was dressed up in blackface to perform in the Mariinsky Ballet's production of La Bayadère.

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Here's the First Trailer for the "In the Heights" Movie

Lights up on Washington Heights—because the trailer for the movie adaptation of the hit Broadway musical In the Heights has arrived. It's our first look into Lin-Manuel Miranda's latest venture into film—because LMM isn't stopping at three Tony awards, a Grammy award, and an Emmy.

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