Liza Voll

What Makes A Great Corps Member? 4 Rules To Live By​

Entering the corps de ballet can be a shock for recent graduates: What's needed by your company is suddenly much different from what helped you succeed as a student. Dance Magazine recently spent a day with some corps members from Boston Ballet, so we asked a few of the dancers for their top tips for success.


Rule #1: Use Your Fellow Corps Members

Liza Voll

Be open to receiving corrections from your peers on steps and spacing. Use each other's eyes as assets.

Rule #2: Think Geometrically On Stage

Liza Voll

Imagine the floor as graph paper, and take note of your distances frontwards, backwards, diagonally and across the stage at all times. Don't just focus on your own choreography—learn all patterns of the stage movement as a whole. This will help you swing from one role to the next if the need arises.

Rule #3: Value Teamwork Above All Else

Liza Voll

Put the production before your personal performance. For instance, if you are seventh in line and the leader lifts the wrong arm onstage, follow their lead, right or wrong. There are no points for being the only one who's "right" if you ruin the overall stage picture.

Rule #4: Don't Lose Focus When You're Not in the Spotlight

Liza Voll

Corps work requires not only selflessness, but strong personal discipline. "Will you still dance your best although you may be able to get away with less? Will you still work hard without individual praise?" asks Boston Ballet dancer Brett Fukuda. Push for the good of the company and the strength of the unit. As former Boston Ballet corps member Brittany Summer says, corps dancers have to be "big-hearted, strong-willed, formidable creatures."


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Courtesy Esse

What It Was Like When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was in the Audience—or Backstage

The 27 years that Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent on the U.S. Supreme Court were 27 years that she spent as one of Washington, D.C.'s most ardent, elegant and erudite supporters of the performing arts. The justice, who died on September 18 of metastatic cancer, was also an avid cultural tourist, traveling to the Santa Fe and Glimmerglass operas nearly every summer, as well as occasionally returning to catch shows in her native New York City.

Ginsburg's opera fandom was well known, but her tastes were wide-ranging. Particularly in the last 10 years of her life, after Ginsburg lost her beloved husband, Marty, it was not unusual for the petite justice and her security detail to be spotted at theaters several nights a week. She saw everything, from classic musicals to serious new plays, plus performances that defied classification, like Martha Clarke's dance drama Chéri, with Alessandra Ferri and Herman Cornejo, which toured to the Kennedy Center in 2014.

To honor Ginsburg, Dance Magazine asked three dance artists whose performances the justice attended to recall what Ginsburg meant to them.

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