The Montreal Dance Scene

Head north and cross the border to Montréal and you’ll find a place of unbridled creativity. Ardent travelers know that this bilingual city resonates with both the style and charm of Europe and the bright-lights allure of a North American hub. Long dance traditions in New York, Paris, London, and Berlin might eclipse Montréal in historical terms. But the city’s current boom, which is rooted in artistic renewal, shifting cultural identities, and vibrant social buzz, makes it a fulcrum for powerful invention.

 

Montréal blasted forward as a center of contemporary dance in the mid-’80s. Its diversity of voices included large established companies like Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, as well as artists ranging from Margie Gillis, Édouard Lock, Marie Chouinard, and Ginette Laurin to Paul-André Fortier and Jean-Pierre Perreault.

 

Because the Québécois are proud of their artists, financial support from government agencies and arts councils kept apace with the burgeoning dance community. This has resulted in a stimulating environment with a strong sense of continuity over the last nearly 30 years. Many of the city’s dance artists have not only established ties within the borders of Québec and Canada, but also across the globe.

 

Before the boom, there were perhaps a handful of professional dance companies. According to the Regroupement québécois de la danse (RQD), an umbrella advocacy organization for professional dance practitioners, Montréal is now home to about 30 professional dance companies and dozens of independent artists, creating jobs that attract more dancers to the city. Another enticement comes from the RQD, which, through its training reimbursement fund, subsidizes dancers by paying a big chunk of their class costs.


Major Companies
After more than 50 years, the still-potent Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal, under the direction of Gradimir Pankov, has a rich European repertory. Choreographers like Jirí Kylián, Mauro Bigonzetti, and Stijn Celis are drawn to the versatile dancers’ musicality, virtuosity, and imagination. The 36-member company is truly international, with 13 dancers from the U.S. It has lots of projects on the go including a countrywide contest for emerging ballet choreographers. The company is a favorite at Jacob’s Pillow, and an exchange with the Houston Ballet will see them perform in Houston next month (Houston Ballet performed in Montreal last spring).

 

Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, now known as [bjm_danse], has evolved with the times, shifting from a cool jazz bent to a more sensual and energy-driven contemporary repertory. Its excellent dancers (three are from the U.S.) shine in delicious concoctions from the likes of Vancouver-based Crystal Pite and rising star Aszure Barton (see cover story, April).

 

Édouard Lock’s company, La La La Human Steps, is known for its daring physical extremes. In his oeuvre, the contemporary, postmodern, and balletic traditions collide. His latest pointe-based work, Amjad, comes to the Brooklyn Academy of Music in November.

 

For decades Marie Chouinard and Ginette Laurin have hypnotized and invigorated audiences. Chouinard makes sexually provocative group pieces like Orphée et Eurydice, which courts Cirque du Soleil playfulness, Las Vegas entertainment values, and in the end is a well-designed frolic. Laurin’s O Vertigo company has developed a highly poetic vocabulary that plays with perception. Both dancemakers recently moved into new state-of-the-art studios.

 

Montréal Danse, with its contemporary repertory, has a long history of inviting choreographers to work with its theatrically engaging performers. It recently premiered British Columbia–based dance artist Sarah Chase’s new work, On the Ice of Labrador, involving highly intimate storytelling.

 

Independent artists

In terms of Montréal’s stars, few attract the kind of allegiance that Margie Gillis and Louise Lecavalier do. Gillis, celebrating 35 years of dance creation, is a major draw, and continues to inspire audiences. Her repertory includes her well-known solo pieces, as well as works featuring a range of performers from opera singer Jessye Norman to rising dancer/choreographer Emily Molnar. Lecavalier, La La La Human Steps’ luminary for nearly two decades, with her muscular, pumped-up body and her fearless physicality, challenged gender lines and conventions. Lecavalier retired from the company in 1999 and has since developed her own projects, including working with Crystal Pite and the innovative improviser Benoît Lachambre.

 

Outside the mainstream, Paul-André Fortier (Fortier Danse Création) continues to raise the bar and, at 60, is at the height of his creative powers. His projects question the rituals of dance itself: How do we use space? How do audiences watch dance?

 

Andrew de Lotbinière Harwood, one of the pioneers of Contact Improvisation, is a respected teacher and the founder of AH HA Productions. Due in part to his influence, there is a strong Contact community in Montréal and the rest of Canada.

 

Belgian-born choreographer Isabelle Van Grimde (Van Grimde Corps Secrets) set down roots in Montréal because she found something fresh in comparison to what she knew in Europe, where she felt there was a blasé attitude. What she encountered in Montréal were people who were enthusiastic and encouraging of enterprising artists. The same could be said for dynamos Los Angeles–born Victor Quijada and Venezuelan-born José Navas. Quijada, with his Rubberbandance Group, bridges elements of b-boying and ballet. Navas and his Compagnie FLAK create “abstract” pure dance with a Cunningham-esque edge.


The Next Generation
Doors are open and change is afoot, especially for an extremely mobile younger generation of choreographer/movers like Dana Michel (Band of Bless), Sasha Kleinplatz/Andrew Tay (Wants & Needs), Hinda Essadiqi, Jean-Sébastien Lourdais, Frédérick Gravel (GravelWorks), and Katie Ward. None of them works on the scale of a Chouinard or Lock. But they are creating links and networks, locally and internationally, quite independently of any preordained circuit. Dave St-Pierre,who pushes the limits of physical dance-theater with raw energy, nudity, and chaotic sensory overload, has European presenters hot on his heels.

 

In fact many Montréal artists aim to work for stretches of time in Europe, not only for artistic affinities, but also because producers there invest in dance with services and cold hard cash. Some companies could not survive without these commissions and touring possibilities. There’s simply not enough touring in Québec, or in the rest of Canada.


Spaces
When the pioneering choreographer Jean-Pierre Perreault—renowned for his landmark piece, Joe, with a cast of over 30 trench-coated, black-hatted average Joes—opened his choreographic center in 2001, he was intent on providing artistic residencies for choreographers both nationally and internationally. Unfortunately the center closed its doors in 2004, less than two years after his death.

 

That closure prompted reflection, and things started percolating. The multidisciplinary Studio 303, which presents a monthly dance series and workshops throughout the year, also has hosted a Canadian-European exchange and an annual NY Artist Exchange with New Dance Alliance. Circuit-Est, founded in 1987 by a group of independent artists who wanted to share resources, moved into Perreault’s former center this spring and offers an eclectic roster of workshops.

 

Festival TransAmériques, devoted to the best in international contemporary dance and theater, inaugurated its first season last year, and serves as a springboard for local dancemakers. A smaller festival, Transatlantique Montréal, is a gutsy fall event that democratizes dance, bringing performances to nontraditional venues outside the downtown core.

 

Place des Arts is Montréal’s grand hall, with five theaters. Dance is presented throughout the year, and Les Grands Ballets Canadiens is the resident dance company. The more intimate Cinquième Salle is where the Rubberbandance Group is in residence.

 

The singular dance presenter Danse Danse has an international scope, welcoming Geneva’s Le Ballet du Grand Théâtre, Akram Khan (with French star Juliette Binoche), and Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui this season. Other well-attended spaces devoted to dance include the Agora de la danse, Espace Tangente (run by American-born Dena Davida), and Centre Pierre-Péladeau. Many of the big names, the hottest young choreographers, and everyone in between, got their start at Tangente.

 

The Montréal dance field is dense with artists of every stripe and season, and the dance card is filling up, in part because the schools and universities keep pumping out new graduates. But the terrain is fertile because dance artists from all over Canada and across the globe come to Montréal. The city is an entryway to ideas, connections, and new possibilities—a place where imaginations are evolving.

 


Philip Szporer is a Montréal-based dance writer, lecturer, and filmmaker.

Tero Saarinen's Morphed. Photo by Darya Popova, Courtesy Helene Davis Public Relations

Choreographer Tero Saarinen has a proclivity for the peculiar—and for epic orchestral music. That he should be commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic to create a new dance work to accompany the U.S. premiere of Bernd Alois Zimmermann's Cello Concerto en forme de pas de trois only makes sense. Zimmermann's eerie, difficult-to-classify composition falls squarely in Saarinen's wheelhouse. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Jan. 19–21. laphil.com.


PC Break the Floor

Two competition routines are equal in technical proficiency, artistry and choreography. One consists of all girls, the other includes a boy. Guess which takes home first prize?

If you guessed the one with the boy, you may be privy to an unspoken and much-debated phenomenon in the competition dance world: The Boy Factor. According to The Boy Factor, a competitive piece is more likely to win if there's a boy in it.

"If it's all technically equal and one group is all girls and the other group has a boy, the one with the boy will win," says Rysa Childress, owner of All Star Studios in Forest Hills, New York. "Boy soloists are sometimes scored higher than more technically proficient girls because if a boy has good stage presence, we let him slide," says an anonymous competition judge. "And most of the feedback will be for the boy."

Keep reading... Show less
Breaking Stereotypes
Ash in Rochester, NY. PC Thaler Photography by Arleen and Daryl Thaler for the Swan Dreams Project

Growing up in inner city Rochester, NY, Aesha Ash was just one of the neighborhood kids. She'd imagine people driving by, judging her by her black skin.

"They'd never know that I was dreaming of becoming a professional ballet dancer. No one would think, Some day she's going to make it into New York City Ballet," says Ash.

After an inspiring career at NYCB, Béjart's Ballet Lausanne and LINES, the January 2006 Dance Magazine cover star—one of our 25 to Watch that year—is no longer performing. But she's determined to use her dance background to change the stereotypes and misconceptions that people—including black people—have about women of color. "I want to show it's okay to embrace our softer side, and let the world know we're multidimensional," says Ash.

Aesha Ash in Richmond, CA. PC Renee Scott via swandreamsproject.org

In 2011, she launched the Swan Dreams Project to inspire kids in the community she grew up in. The original idea was to post images of herself in a tutu all over Rochester. "I remember growing up and in the bodega you'd see images of girls in bikinis on motorbikes," says Ash. "I wanted to replace those with photos that show women of color in a different light."

She knew the power imagery can have: She still remembers what it felt like as a student at the School of American Ballet to see a photo of black ballet dancer Andrea Long. "That image was everything on days when I was feeling disenchanted. I'd see that picture of her, and know that the struggles I was going through, she went through them, too."

Ash soon realized she didn't have the budget to fund her original plan ("I never realized how expensive a bus stop advertisement is!"). But she's made the images available through an online store, and often simply gives away prints at her own expense to schools and students in need of some inspiration.

Any proceeds she makes from the sales go directly to other organizations that are working to expand ballet in diverse communities. One large donation even led to a pointe shoe fund at dancer Robyn Gardenhire's City Ballet of Los Angeles school—and it helped one dancer who had quit ballet because of the expense come back to class.

Now a mother of two in San Jose, CA, Ash will also start teaching a free after-school ballet class at her daughter's public school next month. "I recently taught at Girls Inc. in Oakland, and one of the little black girls said, 'Are you the ballet teacher?' She just stood there, staring at me with her mouth open, like a unicorn had just walked into the room," Ash says. "You never know the impact you can have just by being a presence."

If you're interested in supporting the project, check out the online shop, or donate directly at swandreamsproject.org.

Training
Sylvie Guillem, via 1843magazine.com

Ever find yourself lusting after that six o'clock penché, or a développé that will reach your nose? You're not alone. The eye is naturally drawn to the end points of a movement, and, in dance, that often translates to the highest extension.

But what if you're born without extreme, Instagram-worthy lines? It's a matter of developing a laser focus on alignment as well as strengthening and stretching with better body mechanics in mind.

Keep reading... Show less
Roberto Bolle and Kenall Jenner on set. Photo via tods.com

I'll never forget something Roberto Bolle once told me when I was interviewing him about his workout regimen: Talking about how much he loved to swim, he said, "I would love to go in the Italian sea, but I am too well-known there to show up in my suit."

It always amused and kinda shocked me that a ballet dancer could reach that level of fame. But it's true: In his native Italy, Bolle is a bonafide celerity.

Keep reading... Show less
Anne Arundel Community College students, PC Kenneth Harriford

Everyone knows that community college is an affordable option if a four-year school isn't in the cards. But it can also be a solid foundation for a career in the dance field. Whether students want an associate in arts degree as a precursor to obtaining a bachelor's, or to go straight into the performing world, the right two-year dance program can be a uniquely supportive place to train. Don't let negative stereotypes prevent you from attending a program that could be right for you:

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers & Companies
Joan Marcus

Conscientious theatergoers may be familiar with The School for Scandal, The School for Wives and School of Rock. But how many are also aware of the school of Fosse?

The 1999 musical, a posthumous exploration of the choreographic career of Bob Fosse, ran for 1,093 performances, winning four Tonys and 10 nominations; employing 32 dancers; and, completely unintentionally, nurturing a generation of Broadway choreographers. You may have heard of them: Andy Blankenbuehler and Sergio Trujillo danced in the original cast, Josh Rhodes was a swing, and Christopher Gattelli replaced Trujillo when he landed choreography jobs in Massachusetts and Canada. Blankenbuehler remembers that when Trujillo left, "It was as if he was graduating."

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers & Companies
From left, Ethel Merman, Lin-Manuel Miranda and Debbie Allen. All Courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

January 16 might as well be a Broadway holiday. Three gigantic names were born on this day, in 1908, 1950 and 1980, and they represent three distinct eras of powerhouse musicals. Without them, there'd be no belting Reno Sweeney, no "Fame"-ous Lydia Grant and no rapping Alexander Hamilton. Happy birthday to these indelible superstars.

Keep reading... Show less
News
When it comes to BodyVox, it's best to expect the unexpected. Photo by Lois Greenfield, Courtesy BodyVox

In the midst of its 20th-anniversary season, BodyVox is taking a moment to look back. The Portland, Oregon–based company presents Urban Meadow, an amalgamation of some of its most popular works, at Philadelphia's Prince Theater, Jan. 18–21. Expect whimsy, and the unexpected. bodyvox.com.

Advice for Dancers
A dance career can send you on a roller coaster of emotions, but evaluating reality can help give you perspective. Thinkstock.

I never believe that I deserve to be happy. This reaction kicked in big time since I got a steady job. My emotions are a roller coaster: joy at the chance to perform, terror that the people in charge don't like me and resentment at not getting solo roles. I'm driving myself crazy.

—Terry, Philadelphia, PA

Keep reading... Show less

Sponsored

Videos

Sponsored

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Win It!