Photo by Nathan Sayers

25 to Watch 2018: Erica Lall

Erica Lall credits her tap dancing for the musical sensitivity of her American Ballet Theatre performances. From a wili in Giselle ("I love petit allégro," she says) to a soloist in Marcelo Gomes' contemporary AfterEffect, Lall deftly accents a striking range of choreography. Precise and expressive, she floats on the music, never overstressing the beat. As a Porcelain Princess in Alexei Ratmansky's staging of Aurora's Wedding last spring, she mastered the variation's minute, detailed movements and relentless pointework with a delicate, doll-like charm.


A former competition dancer—Starbound, Showstopper—the 19-year-old fell in love with ballet as a student at Houston Ballet Academy. "Tap was my favorite," she says, "but I loved the challenge of ballet, the refinement of the movement, how nice it felt to finally achieve it." Lall transferred to ABT's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School in 2013, joining the main company in 2016. But she still takes tap and contemporary classes at Broadway Dance Center during company breaks "to feel more grounded."

As a dancer of color in the same company as Misty Copeland, Lall knows she can be a model for young dancers. "I was the only dancer of color in my class," she recalls. "I think things are changing; I want to be a great example." Spoken like a ballerina in the making.


Find out who else made Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" list this year.

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How Turning Boards and Practice Mats Can Revolutionize Your Dance Training

When it comes to equipment, dancers don't need much—just shoes and whatever can fit in their dance bag. But between rehearsals in the studio and performances on stage, one major piece of equipment often goes overlooked—the floor.

Dancers too often find themselves warming up on the concrete or carpet backstage, or wanting to practice in a location without a proper floor. For years, Harlequin Floors has offered a solution to this problem with its innovative turning board, offering a portable and personal floor that can be flipped between marley and wood. Now, they've revolutionized portability again with their practice mat, offering dancers the option to roll up their own personal floor and sling it over their shoulders like a yoga mat.

We spoke with experts from every corner of the dance industry to see how Harlequin's products have become their everyday essentials:

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