Dancers Trending

Benjamin Millepied is Making A Movie

Morgan Lugo

We had a feeling this news was coming, but now it's official: Benjamin Millepied is directing a movie.

Variety just broke the news that he'll be making his directorial debut with Carmen, a film inspired by Georges Bizet's highly successful opera. The story will focus on a woman traveling from the Mexican desert to Los Angeles "in search of freedom," according to Variety's report.


It's no surprise that Millepied quickly caught Hollywood fever since moving back to Los Angeles after stepping down as Paris Opéra Ballet's artistic director. At L.A. Dance Project, he's put a premium on collaborating with artists of different genres, and has experimented with several short films. Considering his Black Swan background and movie star wife, film seems like a natural next step.

We're pumped to find out that there will definitely be dance involved. Millepied is not only directing the movie, but also creating choreography for it. Here's hoping dance plays a major role.

He's also lined up several A-list collaborators: composer Nicholas Britell (Moonlight), cinematographer Darius Khondji (Midnight in Paris) and producers Dimitri Rassam (The Little Prince) and Helen Estabrook (Whiplash).

No details on casting have been announced yet, but shooting is set to begin in Los Angeles early next year. We can't wait to see what Millepied does with this.

Career Advice
Kate Torline via Unsplash

New York City–based choreographer and director Jennifer Weber once worked on a project with a strict social media policy: " 'Hire no one with less than 10K, period'—and that was a few years ago," she says. "Ten thousand is a very small number now, especially on Instagram."

The commercial dance world is in a period of transition, where social media handles and follower counts are increasingly requested by casting directors, but rarely offered by dancers up front. "I can see it starting to show up on resumés, though, alongside a dancer's height and hair color," predicts Weber.

Keep reading... Show less
UA Dance Ensemble members Candice Barth and Gregory Taylor in Jessica Lang's "Among the Stars." Photo by Ed Flores, courtesy University of Arizona

If you think becoming a trainee or apprentice is the only path to gaining experience in a dance company environment, think again.

The University of Arizona, located in the heart of Tucson, acclimates dancers to the pace and rigor of company life while offering all the academic opportunities of a globally-ranked university. If you're looking to get a head-start on your professional dance career—or to just have a college experience that balances company-level training and repertory with rigorous academics—the University of Arizona's undergraduate and graduate programs have myriad opportunites to offer:

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers Trending
Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light in DESCENT, which our readers chose as last year's "Most Moving Performance." Photo by Jay Newman, courtesy Kinetic Light

Yes, we realize it's only August. But we can't help but to already be musing about all the incredible dance happenings of 2019.

We're getting ready for our annual Readers' Choice feature, and we want to hear from you about the shows you can't stop thinking about, the dance videos that blew your mind and the artists you discovered this year who everyone should know about.

Keep reading... Show less
Career Advice
Peter Smith, courtesy of University Musical Society

What happens during a performance is the product of the painstaking process of realizing an artistic vision. Whether held beforehand, afterward, offsite or online, audience discussions tend not to be so preordained, easily thrown off track without a skilled moderator at the helm.

"I'm someone who dreaded talkbacks and Q&As," admits Bill Bragin, former director of public programming at Lincoln Center. "While I was in New York, a lot of the time it was just audience members trying to show off how smart they were."

These events present a pile of difficult questions: How much do you reveal about a piece before it's shown? How can a conversation designed to hit key points feel casual and spontaneous? How do you cater to the needs of diverse attendees, from novice dancegoers to lifelong fans to scholars and critics? And how do you avoid smothering dance with language, flattening all its complexity?

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox