The First Trailer for Carlos Acosta's Biopic Just Dropped, And We're Shook

We admit it. We're picky about dance movies. They don't always represent our beloved art form accurately, or use real dancers to play the main roles.

But we just watched the first trailer for the new Carlos Acosta biopic, Yuli, and we're kinda speechless:


There's an adorable young actor—Edilson Manuel Olbera Núñez—playing Acosta (who looks so much like him)! There's Acosta himself! There's what looks like high stakes, a compelling plot and gorgeous cinematography! And there's so. Much. Dancing. This film looks like everything we've ever wanted a dance biopic to be.

Based on Acosta's memoir, No Way Home, Yuli follows the ballet prodigy-turned-director/choreographer from the slums of Havana to stardom at The Royal Ballet.

Cuban dancer Keyvin Martínez couldn't be a more perfect fit to play an adolescent Acosta: He's performed with Ballet Nacional de Cuba and Acosta's own company, Acosta Danza, and based on the trailer, has some serious acting chops.

The film premieres in Spain later this month, and we're crossing our fingers that it makes its way stateside sooner than later.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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