Quinn Wharton

Inside Dancers' Love-Hate Relationships with their Feet

In all of their swollen and blistered glory, feet are dancers' prized possessions. It doesn't matter whether you treasure your arches, wince at your bunions or wish you could trade the whole kit in for a new pair—you can't help but take pride in the instrument that literally supports you from the ground up. Each foot contains the intricate muscles needed to finish a line, travel the length of a stage, soar through the air with abandon and carry you home after a long day of dancing.


Lloyd Knight, principal at Martha Graham Dance Company

Quinn Wharton

"My feet have been through a lot, and their scars show the work I've done so far as a dancer. We work so much with bare feet in Graham that I have a lot of marley burns, cuts and splits. It's like a badge of honor."

Kathryn Boren, corps de ballet dancer at American Ballet Theatre

Quinn Wharton

"My feet have become my business card. Really, I'm defined by them. I can pick myself out of blurry rehearsal footage because I can recognize my arches. My right arch is better than my left, which is a complex I've had to deal with my whole life."

Soledad Barrio, star of Noche Flamenca

Quinn Wharton

"I give messages with my feet to the guitarists and singers to advise them on when to start and when to stop. There is a very clear vocabulary."

Demi Remick, tap dancer for Postmodern Jukebox and Caleb Teicher & Company

Quinn Wharton

"My feet get injured a lot, so I don't always trust them. As a tap dancer, I need relaxed ankles, and sprains affect that. I have to release them even though I'm scared. But my feet are smarter than I think. I dance on a four-by-four board on tour and my feet memorize the space and what's possible within it."

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Inside one of Interlochen's brand-new dance studios. Courtesy Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen’s New Breathtaking Dance Center Is Ready for Class

After months of practicing in a cramped space at home, young dancers have dreamed of training in a spacious, airy studio. And when the facilities are as resplendent as the brand-new dance center at Michigan's Interlochen Center for the Arts, everyday technique class is to be savored.

The recently renovated and vastly expanded 26,000-square-foot Dance Center at Interlochen is now a world-class facility on par with those of premier conservatories and professional companies. Joseph Morrissey, Interlochen's director of dance, says a lot of careful thought went into the architecture: "This could not just be a building that dance is going to go into. This is a building that is made for dance." To build the best facilities for his students, Morrissey sought out Flansburgh Architects, the group behind the beautiful Perles Family Studio at Jacob's Pillow.

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July 2021