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Bob Fosse Asked Dancers to Strip Down in the '70s—But Would that Fly Today?

What is an acceptable request from a choreographer in terms of nudity? On the first day of shooting All That Jazz in the 1970s, Bob Fosse asked us men to remove everything but our jock straps and the women to remove their tops. His rationale was to shock us in order to build character, and it felt disloyal to refuse. Would this behavior be considered okay today?

—Anonymous


I sincerely doubt it. While nudity may further a choreographer's artistic vision at times, you don't need to participate if it falls outside of your comfort zone or if it's just billed as a way to "build character." What might have slipped under the radar back then is being subjected to enhanced scrutiny now as companies address sexual harassment. The American Guild of Musical Artists, The Actors Fund, Dance/USA and other groups have all been examining studio and performance practices to ensure appropriate guidelines.

Many uses of nudity in dance are not harassment, but asking dancers to participate in such a vulnerable act shouldn't be taken lightly. There needs to be an open channel of communication between a choreographer and dancers to make sure everyone feels respected and comfortable.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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