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Bob Fosse Asked Dancers to Strip Down in the '70s—But Would that Fly Today?

What is an acceptable request from a choreographer in terms of nudity? On the first day of shooting All That Jazz in the 1970s, Bob Fosse asked us men to remove everything but our jock straps and the women to remove their tops. His rationale was to shock us in order to build character, and it felt disloyal to refuse. Would this behavior be considered okay today?

—Anonymous


I sincerely doubt it. While nudity may further a choreographer's artistic vision at times, you don't need to participate if it falls outside of your comfort zone or if it's just billed as a way to "build character." What might have slipped under the radar back then is being subjected to enhanced scrutiny now as companies address sexual harassment. The American Guild of Musical Artists, The Actors Fund, Dance/USA and other groups have all been examining studio and performance practices to ensure appropriate guidelines.

Many uses of nudity in dance are not harassment, but asking dancers to participate in such a vulnerable act shouldn't be taken lightly. There needs to be an open channel of communication between a choreographer and dancers to make sure everyone feels respected and comfortable.

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Luke Isley, Courtesy Ballet West

How Do Choreographers Bring Something Fresh to Music We've Heard Over and Over?

In 2007, Oregon Ballet Theatre asked Nicolo Fonte to choreograph a ballet to Maurice Ravel's Boléro. "I said, 'No way. I'm not going near it,' " recalls Fonte. "I don't want to compete with the Béjart version, ice skaters or the movie 10. No, no, no!"

But Fonte's husband encouraged him to "just listen and get a visceral reaction." He did. And Bolero turned into one of Fonte's most requested and successful ballets.

Not all dance renditions of similar warhorse scores have worked out so well. Yet the irresistible siren song of pieces like Stravinsky's The Firebird and The Rite of Spring, as well as the perennial Carmina Burana by Carl Orff, seem too magnetic for choreographers to ignore.

And there are reasons for their popularity. Some were commissioned specifically for dance: Rite and Firebird for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes; Boléro for dance diva Ida Rubinstein's post–Ballets Russes troupe. Hypnotic rhythms (Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel) and danceable melodies (Bizet's Carmen) make a case for physical eye candy. Audience familiarity can also help box office receipts. Still, many choreographers have been sabotaged by the formidable nature and Muzak-y overuse of these iconic compositions.

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