Photo by Scott Shaw

As the Gibney Empire Expands, So Does the Dance Company

Gina Gibney runs two enormous dance spaces in New York City: Together they contain 23 studios, five performance spaces, a gallery, a conference room, a media lab and more. Gibney is now probably the largest dance center in the country. It's not surprising that Dance Magazine named Gina Gibney one of the most influential people in dance today.


The new branding calls for it to simply be called Gibney (as opposed to Gibney Dance), to reflect its range of public programs, affordable work space and commitment to social justice issues. In addition to Gibney's new partnership with the Joyce Theater Foundation and its support for emerging artists and activists, Gibney also houses the Gibney Dance Company, which was founded in 1991.

Gina Gibney is always challenging her dancers with new projects. The company has brought dance to women's shelters and conducted Community Actions combining artistry and outreach all over the world. The company members are also empowered to make their own works. The upcoming performances on May 3–5 will feature a new work by senior company director Amy Miller called Valence, with an original score by Peter Swendsen. Guest choreographer Bryan Arias, who recently made a piece for Paul Taylor Dance Company, premieres One Thousand Million Seconds. Both works show a poignant sense of connection between dancers.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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