Photo by Scott Shaw

As the Gibney Empire Expands, So Does the Dance Company

Gina Gibney runs two enormous dance spaces in New York City: Together they contain 23 studios, five performance spaces, a gallery, a conference room, a media lab and more. Gibney is now probably the largest dance center in the country. It's not surprising that Dance Magazine named Gina Gibney one of the most influential people in dance today.


The new branding calls for it to simply be called Gibney (as opposed to Gibney Dance), to reflect its range of public programs, affordable work space and commitment to social justice issues. In addition to Gibney's new partnership with the Joyce Theater Foundation and its support for emerging artists and activists, Gibney also houses the Gibney Dance Company, which was founded in 1991.

Gina Gibney is always challenging her dancers with new projects. The company has brought dance to women's shelters and conducted Community Actions combining artistry and outreach all over the world. The company members are also empowered to make their own works. The upcoming performances on May 3–5 will feature a new work by senior company director Amy Miller called Valence, with an original score by Peter Swendsen. Guest choreographer Bryan Arias, who recently made a piece for Paul Taylor Dance Company, premieres One Thousand Million Seconds. Both works show a poignant sense of connection between dancers.

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TaraMarie Perri in tree pose at Storm King Art Center. Photo by Sophie Kuller, Courtesy Perri

5 Self-Soothing Exercises You Can Do to Calm Your Anxiety

Physical stillness can be one of the hardest things to master in dance. But stillness in the bigger sense—like when your career and life are on hold—goes against every dancers' natural instincts.

"Dancers are less comfortable with stillness and change than most," says TaraMarie Perri, founder and director of Perri Institute for Mind and Body and Mind Body Dancer. "Through daily discipline, we are trained to move through space and are attracted to forward momentum. Simply put, dancers are far more comfortable when they have a sense of control over the movements and when life is 'in action.' "

To regain that sense of control, and soothe some of the anxiety most of us are feeling right now, it helps to do what we know best: Get back into our bodies. Certain movements and shapes can help ground us, calm our nervous system and bring us into the present.

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