Inside DM

Meet The Editors


Jenn Stahl

Jennifer Stahl, Editor In Chief

Jennifer has contributed to Dance Magazine since graduating from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts with a BFA in dance and journalism. She's danced for California's Peninsula Ballet Theatre, Israeli choreographer Gali Hod and Cirque du Soleil's 25th-anniversary celebration. She has served as a judge for the Capezio A.C.E. Awards and as an adjudicator for the American College Dance Association. A former senior editor of Pointe, she has also written for The Atlantic, Runner's World and other publications.

Raymond E. Mingst
Raymond Mingst, Creative Director

Raymond discovered his earliest dance inspiration in print in the photographs of Barbara Morgan, specifically her collaborations with Martha Graham. As an art and creative director he has been recognized with numerous awards. Raymond is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and cofounder of the contemporary art gallery Curious Matter.


Madeline Schrock
Madeline Schrock, Managing Editor

A native of Floyds Knobs, Indiana, Madeline studied ballet at Southern Indiana School for the Arts and was later introduced to modern dance by Bill Evans. While completing her BFA in Dance Performance and Choreography at Ohio University's Honors Tutorial College, she was cast in a historical reconstruction of Alwin Nikolais' Noumenon celebrating the 100th anniversary of his birth. As an avid dance videographer and editor, she has worked on video projects for Bates Dance Festival and the Regina Klenjoski Dance Company in Southern California. She later served as a marketing and education manager for Lar Lubovitch Dance Company. She is currently the managing editor of Dance Magazine and Pointe.


Marissa DeSantis, Assistant Editor

Marissa joins Dance Magazine having worked as a beauty editor for publications like Teen Vogue and InStyle. She graduated from Rider University with a BFA in dance and journalism, training at the Princeton Ballet School during her studies. She has also danced with The Rock School and South Jersey Ballet Theater.


Courtney-Escoyne
Courtney Escoyne, Assistant Editor

A native of Lafayette, Louisiana, Courtney danced with Lafayette Ballet Theatre before matriculating to New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, where she graduated with a BFA in dance. She has performed in works by Karole Armitage, Netta Yerushalmy, Septime Webre, Vita Osojnik, Cherylyn Lavagnino, Giada Ferrone and Fairul Zahid, among others. She continues to take class, create and perform in the city.


Lauren Wingenroth - Headshot-2
Lauren Wingenroth, Assistant Editor

A native of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, Lauren is a graduate of Barnard College with degrees in Dance and English. She has performed works by Annie B Parson, Mark Dendy, Reggie Wilson and Karla Wolfangle, and has danced with with e r a dance collective and TREES. While at Barnard/Columbia she choreographed and collaborated on several original musical theater works, among them the 120th Annual Varsity Show. She now serves as a member of the Dance/NYC Junior Committee.


Kelsey Grills, Audience Engagement Editor

A native Floridian, Kelsey graduated cum laude from Florida State University with a BFA in Dance. While at FSU she had the pleasure of interning at the Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography, where she assisted artists-in-residence such as Liz Lerman, Big Dance Theatre, Okwui Okpokwasili and Dayna Hanson. In 2014 she received the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Award which provided funding for her documentary, and subsequent dance piece, "Two-Point Stance." This work has been presented at numerous symposiums and festivals, including a TEDx performance in Tallahassee, Fl. Her performance career includes dancing with Jawole Willa Jo Zollar (Urban Bush Women), Jennifer Archibald (Arch Dance Company), and Alex Ketley (The Foundry) as well as assisting Choreographer/Filmmaker, Celia Rowlson-Hall. Kelsey currently resides in NYC where she continues to fuel her curiosity through dance and activism.


WendyPerron_BokovFactory
Wendy Perron, Editor at Large


Wendy danced with the Trisha Brown Company in the 1970s and has performed with many other NYC choreographers. Her own group, the Wendy Perron Dance Company, appeared at the Lincoln Center Festival, the Joyce, Danspace Project and other venues in the U.S. and abroad from 1983 to 1997. The documentary film Retracing Steps: American Dance Since Postmodernism profiles Perron along with seven other choreographers. She has taught at many colleges including Bennington and Princeton, has given lectures on dance across the country, and was associate director of Jacob's Pillow in the early '90s. In addition to serving as editor in chief of Dance Magazine from 2004 to 2013, she has written for The New York Times, The Village Voice, Ballet Review and Dance Europe. In 2011 she was inducted into the New York Foundation for the Arts' Hall of Fame and was honored by Dancewave in Brooklyn in 2014. She has been artistic adviser to the Fall for Dance Festival and often adjudicates for Youth America Grand Prix and the American College Dance Festival. Currently she teaches a graduate seminar at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and performs occasionally with Vicky Shick. Her book, Through the Eyes of a Dancer, is a selection of her essays, memoirs, and reviews spanning 40 years.

Show Comments ()
Dance in Pop Culture

The revival of everything '90s has been in full-swing for a while now—we saw Destiny's Child reunite at Coachella, Britney Spears is headed back on tour, and the Spice Girls miiight be performing at the Royal wedding next month. But Hollywood saved the best '90s moment for last, bringing *NSYNC back together to receive their official star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on April 30.

Because we love a good dance #TBT, we're reliving five of the boys' best dance moments.

"I Want You Back"

The band's first single from their self-titled debut album in 1998, "I Want You Back," was the start of their takeover (and their choreographed dance moves).

Keep reading... Show less
Popular

Looking for your next audition shoe? Shot at and in collaboration with Broadway Dance Center, Só Dança has launched a new collection of shoes working with some pretty famous faces of the musical theater world! Offered in two different styles and either 2.5" or 3" heels, top industry professionals are loving how versatile and supportive these shoes are! Pro tip: The heel is centered under the body so you can feel confident and stable!

Health & Body
StockSnap

When I wrote about my struggle with depression, and eventual departure from dance because of it, I expected criticism. I was prepared to be challenged. But much to my relief, and horror, dancers from all over the world responded with support and stories of solidarity. The most critical response I saw was this one:

"Dance isn't for everyone."

This may as well be a mantra in the dance world. We have become entrenched in the Darwinian notion that the emotionally weak will be weeded out. There is no room for them anyway.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Training
Name calling, physical intimidation and cyberbullying are all-too-common experiences among male dancers. Photo by Goh Rhy Yan/Unsplash

Growing up in a family-owned dance studio in Missouri had its perks for tap dancer Anthony Russo. But it also earned him constant taunting, especially in high school.

"There was a junior in my sophomore year health class who was absolutely relentless," he says. "I'd get tripped on my way to the front of the classroom and he'd say, 'Watch out, twinkle toes.' If I raised my hand and answered a question incorrectly, I'd hear a patronizing 'Nice one, Bojangles.' "

Keep reading... Show less
What Wendy's Watching
Photo by Scott Shaw

Gina Gibney runs two enormous dance spaces in New York City: Together they contain 23 studios, five performance spaces, a gallery, a conference room, a media lab and more. Gibney is now probably the largest dance center in the country. It's not surprising that Dance Magazine named Gina Gibney one of the most influential people in dance today.

Keep reading... Show less
What Dancers Eat
Maria Kochetkova blatantly breaks the not-eating-in-your-Serenade-costume rules with a personal pint backstage. Photo via Instagram

One of the biggest myths about ballet dancers is that they don't eat. While we all know that, yes, there are those who do struggle with body image issues and eating disorders, most healthy dancers love food—and eat plenty of it to fuel their busy schedules.

Luckily for us, they're not afraid to show it:

Keep reading... Show less
News
Acosta Danza in Jorge Crecis' Twelve. Photo by Johan Persson, Courtesy Sadler's Wells

What does a superstar like Carlos Acosta do after bidding farewell to his career in classical ballet? In Acosta's case, he returns to his native country, Cuba, to funnel his fame, connections and prodigious energies back into the dance scene that formed him. Because of its top-notch, state-supported training programs and popular embrace of the art of dance, Cuba is brimming with talented dancers. What it has been short on, until recently, are opportunities outside of the mainstream companies, as well as access to a more international repertoire. That is changing now, and, with the creation of Acosta Danza, launched in 2016, Acosta is determined to open the doors even wider to new ideas and audiences.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance Training
University of Kentucky students travel to Arts Advocacy Day in DC each year. PC Dana Rogers Photography

There's so much more to the dance world than making and performing dances. Arts administrators do everything from raising money to managing companies to building new audiences. With the growing number of arts administration programs in colleges, dancers have an opportunity to position themselves for a multifaceted career on- or offstage—and to bring their unique perspective as artists to administrative work.

Keep reading... Show less
Dance in Pop Culture
Photo via the Hammer Museum

While Solange was busy helping big sis Beyoncé give Coachella its best performances of all time, an equally compelling project was quietly circulating on Instagram:

Keep reading... Show less
Dancer Voices
"There is a palpable sense of hope for the future." Photo by Devin Alberda via Instagram

New York City Ballet continues its first year without Peter Martins at the helm as our spring season opens tonight.

When he retired at the start of the new year, we plunged headfirst into unknown, murky waters. Who would the new director be? When would we know? Would we dancers get some say in the decision? Who would oversee the Balanchine ballets? Who would be in charge of casting? Would a new director bring along huge upheaval? Could some of us be out of a job?

Keep reading... Show less

Sponsored

Viral Videos

Sponsored

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Giveaways