Flex dancers in rehearsal at Park Avenue Armory. Photo by Stephanie Berger, Courtesy Park Avenue Armory

Forsythe, Flex, Azealia Banks: You're Going to Want to Grab a Ticket to This Free Event

The Shed might not open its doors for another year, but this month Manhattan's new multidisciplinary arts center is showcasing the type of programming it hopes to offer. A Prelude to The Shed takes over an empty lot near the High Line for two weeks of ever-shifting programming. It will include dance battles featuring Reggie "Regg Roc" Gray's D.R.E.A.M. Ring and FlexNYC program; This variation, an immersive dance/sound experience by Tino Sehgal; and a new work commissioned from William Forsythe reimagining the pas de deux from his iconic In the middle, somewhat elevated. And those are just the dance offerings. May 1–13. Once the Prelude ends, we're particularly looking forward to a new production with music by Sia and choreography by Akram Khan set to premiere as part of The Shed's inaugural season next spring.

Tickets for A Prelude to The Shed are free and can be reserved beginning Thursday, April 5 at 12:00 pm EST at theshed.org.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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