Career Advice
Angle and Kowroski in Christopher Wheeldon's Liturgy. Photo by Paul Kolnik, courtesy NYCB

When I joined the New York City Ballet, I had a million questions. How soon before a performance should I get ready? When should I eat dinner—before or after the performance? How long should I wear my false eyelashes before I throw them out? Should I practice hard steps onstage before the curtain goes up or save them for the show? How long should my warm-up be? How do I do well in this career?

Before long, I discovered that the older dancers were willing to help us newbies. Wendy Whelan, for instance, took me under her wing and helped me with everything from my hair and makeup to what to eat for energy before a performance.

I wanted to see what questions NYCB's newest batch of corps members Mira Nadon, Kennard Henson and Gabriella Domini had. To answer their questions, I spoke to two of our most senior dancers, Maria Kowroski (who's been with the company 24 years) and Jared Angle (who's danced here 21 years).

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Advice for Dancers
If your parents are overly supportive of you pursuing dance, it may become difficult to gauge your own interest. Getty Images

I don't understand why I've lost my motivation to dance at 20 years old. My parents have always encouraged me to have a life plan and ask continuously how my pre-professional training program is going. I feel crushed by their expectations. I'm actually relieved when I get injured and can't dance, even though I miss it.

—Confused, Nashville, TN

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Advice for Dancers
Remember, a successful dance career is a result of your hard work. Photo by Joshua Rawson-Harris/Unsplash

I've never been happier! I have a steady dance gig, a boyfriend and a nice apartment. The only problem is I'm terrified of losing everything. Is this normal?

—Chris, Queens, NY

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Advice for Dancers
While it's smart for a director to recognize your strengths, developing other aspects of your artistry can help you be considered for a greater variety of roles. Thinkstock

I always dreamed of being a lead dancer. But since reaching my goal, I feel stuck performing the same bravura roles year after year. I want to do more expressive parts, too. How can I expand my range?

—Typecast, San Francisco, CA

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