Advice for Dancers
If your parents are overly supportive of you pursuing dance, it may become difficult to gauge your own interest. Getty Images

I don't understand why I've lost my motivation to dance at 20 years old. My parents have always encouraged me to have a life plan and ask continuously how my pre-professional training program is going. I feel crushed by their expectations. I'm actually relieved when I get injured and can't dance, even though I miss it.

—Confused, Nashville, TN

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Advice for Dancers
Remember, a successful dance career is a result of your hard work. Photo by Joshua Rawson-Harris/Unsplash

I've never been happier! I have a steady dance gig, a boyfriend and a nice apartment. The only problem is I'm terrified of losing everything. Is this normal?

—Chris, Queens, NY

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Advice for Dancers
While it's smart for a director to recognize your strengths, developing other aspects of your artistry can help you be considered for a greater variety of roles. Thinkstock

I always dreamed of being a lead dancer. But since reaching my goal, I feel stuck performing the same bravura roles year after year. I want to do more expressive parts, too. How can I expand my range?

—Typecast, San Francisco, CA

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Advice for Dancers
Nowadays, landing a trainee contract is a usual step toward a full company contract. Photo by Kyle Broad/Unsplash

I feel like a loser after auditioning for a ballet company. Instead of a job, I landed a position in their trainee program. I refused it and switched to a school with a Limón curriculum, which doesn't do it for me. Now what?

—Failure, New York, NY

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Advice for Dancers
Losing a dance company can be like losing part of your family. Photo by Thinkstock.

My life is in complete chaos since my dance company disbanded. I have a day job, so money isn't the issue. It's the loss of my world that stings the most. What can I do?

—Lost Career, Washington, DC

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Advice for Dancers
A dance career can send you on a roller coaster of emotions, but evaluating reality can help give you perspective. Thinkstock.

I never believe that I deserve to be happy. This reaction kicked in big time since I got a steady job. My emotions are a roller coaster: joy at the chance to perform, terror that the people in charge don't like me and resentment at not getting solo roles. I'm driving myself crazy.

—Terry, Philadelphia, PA

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Advice for Dancers
Pixabay

My girlfriend wants me to say "no" to extra work outside of the company. During breaks, I typically teach master classes, do gigs and choreograph. I love these opportunities, but I'm always tired and it interferes with our time together. What should I do?

—Principal Dancer, New York, NY

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Career Advice
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When dancers are unhappy or uncomfortable in the studio, healthy communication is essential. Perhaps you feel slighted by a casting decision, dissatisfied with a new rehearsal schedule or uneasy about something a choreographer has asked you to do.

What can you do? Here are three strategies to keep in mind.

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