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Jawole Willa Jo Zollar "is an artist who understands how to pull things out to find the essence of a work," says Robert Battle. Here, Zollar in the studio with Ailey dancers. Photo by Erica Hochstedler, Courtesy AAADT

Coming this fall to the ever-expanding Ailey organization is an intriguing new event: the Choreography Unlocked festival. From Oct. 12–14 and 26–28, the Joan Weill Center for Dance will host workshops, performances and panel discussions. It is an extension of Ailey's New Directions Choreography Lab, an annual residency fellowship for four emerging and mid-career choreographers, founded by artistic director Robert Battle in 2011.

Cameron McKinney working with students at The Ailey School through the New Directions Choreography Lab. Photo by Nicole Tintle, Courtesy AAADT

The festival offers a rare experience for choreographers to work collectively on their craft, and for students and public audiences to interact firsthand with the process of creating dance. "Choreographers tend to section off on their own, so I wanted to offer classes for them to come together and vibe off each other," says Battle. He also hopes to demystify the choreographic process for audiences.

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Alice Sheppard in DESCENT. Photo by MANCC/Chris Cameron

You nominated the best performances you've seen so far in 2018, and we narrowed them down to our favorites. Now it's time to cast your vote to decide who will be featured in our December issue!

Voting is open until September 17. Only one submission per person will be counted.

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Netta Yerushalmy (back left) deconstructs masterworks in Paramodernities. Photo by Paula Lobo, Courtesy Yerushalmy

In Paramodernities, Netta Yerushalmy deconstructs dance masterworks and presents their movement alongside scholarly essays that contextualize them. Yerushalmy has had a sterling dance career, working with Doug Varone's company and freelancing with notables like Joanna Kotze, as well as making her own dances. This particular project is in demand in such places as Jacob's Pillow this month, and later at venues across the country, including multiple New York City sites.

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Kotze and her collaborators in rehearsal. Photo by Carolyn Silverman, Courtesy NYLA

Joanna Kotze can twist and lurch in surprising ways. Her rigorous, vigorous, juicy and slightly zany choreography has been gaining attention in recent years. For What will we be like when we get there, she collaborates with dancer Netta Yerushalmy, visual artist Jonathan Allen and composer Ryan Seaton to explore intimacy and all its accompanying fantasies and flaws. New York Live Arts, March 28–31. newyorklivearts.org.

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Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener. Photo by Caterina Verde, Courtesy Danspace Project.

It's easy to think of sculpture as a static form, but what happens when you place it in the midst of a public park and invite performing artists to inhabit it? Passerby have been finding that out since Josiah McElheny's Prismatic Park arrived in Manhattan's Madison Square Park this June. Madison Square Park Conservancy's Mad. Sq. Art partnered with Danspace Project to offer residencies to four beloved downtown dance artists to create, rehearse and perform under the public eye atop McElheny's green prismatic-glass floor. Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener already had the first go at the end of June, but Aug. 1–6 and 8–13 will see the fearless Netta Yerushalmy take on the challenge (continuing work on her Paramodernites series), followed by Jodi Melnick in September. danspaceproject.org.

Check out an excerpt from Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener's residency!

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