Dancers Trending

We're Obsessed With Blood Orange's Latest Dance-Centric Video

We're not gonna lie: Blood Orange is quickly becoming an office favorite here at DM. His wonderfully off-beat videos feature purposely unpolished choreography in a range of styles. Dance has become an increasingly significant facet of his artistic output of late—such as his delightful collaboration with Maria Kochetkova a couple of months ago. The most recent music video for his song "Better Than Me" features 13 gorgeous contemporary dancers performing Juri Onuki's choreography alongside Dev Hynes (the man behind the persona), and it's utterly captivating.

Before we see (or hear) Hynes, we see besuited dancers. The camera catches a handful of them (seemingly) mid-improv, one dancer stepping backward to sweep into an off-balance attitude, another catching herself with her hands as she tips over into a penché.

The song proper begins as Hynes (in a baseball cap, as per usual) and the dancers scuttle from the sides of the space (think deserted office chic) into formation. They start in unison and break into a two group canon, featuring precise (yet funky) homolateral movements, wild attitude turns and off-kilter extensions. Hynes gamely attacks the topsy-turvy sequences, legs and all.

Hynes also gets in on the improv the second time around, and his focused enthusiasm doesn't seem out of place next to the nonchalantly powerful dancers.

There's even a postlude of sorts once the lyrics wind down, featuring brief, super-structured duos and trios set to an instrumental track.

Obsessed yet? Welcome to the club. Check out the full video below.

 

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