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A Spooky Sleeping Beauty Soiree

In our Fall Preview—featuring some of the season’s hottest attractions—we highlighted Matthew Bourne’s new production of Sleeping Beauty which debuts tonight at New York City Center. The production runs in New York through November 3 (before hitting the road on a national tour), and on Halloween night, City Center has organized special celebrations in honor of the spooky show.

 

You may be thinking, What the heck does Princess Aurora have to do with Halloween? Bourne is the key ingredient here—his restaging includes a vampire at the core of the story. (Check out Roslyn Sulcas’ preview of the work here.) But back to the celebrating: If you’re a ticket holder on Halloween night, you’re invited to a free, pre-show party from 5:30–7:15 at The Bar at The Dream hotel (210 West 55th st.). Come in costume, and enjoy “Blood-tini” and “Bloody Good Bubbly” champagne cocktails. 

 

Visit NYCityCenter.org for ticket info, and the production’s official website for photos, video clips and upcoming tour dates.

The Conversation
James Whiteside (Jayme Thornton for Dance Magazine)

Say you're perpetually impeccable designer Thom Browne. Say you're planning your Spring 2020 Paris menswear show along a "Versailles country club" theme. Say you want a world-class danseur to open the show with some kind of appropriately fabulous choreography.

Who do you call? James Whiteside, of course. On Saturday, the American Ballet Theatre principal—wearing pointe shoes and a glorious pinstriped tutu—kicked off Browne's presentation at the École des Beaux-Arts with a 15-minute, show-stealing solo. Whiteside choreographed the piece himself, with the help of detailed notes from the designer.

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Health & Body
Getty Images

I'd been a professional dancer for five years when I realized the pain I'd been feeling in my hip and down my sciatic nerve was not going away. I had been treating it for two years as we dancers do—with regular visits to my masseuse, physical therapy, baths, ice and lots of Aleve—but I never stopped dancing. It finally dawned on me that if I kept going at the speed I was going (which was, well, speedy), the pain would only get more severe and unrelenting, and I might never dance again.

I told myself I'd take two months off, and all would be better.

That first morning when I woke up at 10 am, I had no idea what to do with myself. My life until that moment had been dictated by class and rehearsal, every hour accounted for. How should I fill the huge swath of time ahead of me?

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