How Did Fred Astaire Help Debbie Reynolds Learn to Dance?

After the spooky mother-daughter passing of Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher last week, the Internet is aglow with clips of one or the other or both. Focusing on one great scene, the “Good Morning" song from Singin' in the Rain, one might assume that Reynolds was as experienced a dancer as the formidable Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor.

But no. In 1951, when Debbie Reynolds was chosen to star with Gene Kelly in MGM's Singin' in the Rain, she was 19 and had almost no experience dancing or singing. Kelly, understandably, was furious. But Louis B. Mayer had made the decision and that was that.

Reynolds was given three months to “learn to dance." Three teachers would alternate giving her private lessons. “I was dancing eight hours a day, nonstop," she writes in her memoir, which is excerpted in Reading Dancing, the wonderful anthology edited by Robert Gottlieb. She was so frustrated that she threw her tap shoes at the mirror, shattering it. She would spend all her studio time holding back tears. And then…“One day I was lying under the piano sobbing when I heard a voice ask, 'Why are you crying?'" She vented her frustration: “I feel like I'm going to die, it's so hard. I can't…I can't…"

The voice gently calmed her down. She looked up and saw Fred Astaire, standing next to the piano, with concern on his face. He told her that he gets frustrated and upset too, and invited her to watch a rehearsal with Hermes Pan while they prepared for Royal Wedding. She saw how hard he worked and left the studio feeling less alone.

And of course, in the final movie, she miraculously keeps up with Kelly and O'Connor—and adds her own effervescence. Take a look at her in the happy-go-lucky “Good Morning" number. She's quick, effortless and bubbling with joy and camaraderie.

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Inside one of Interlochen's brand-new dance studios. Courtesy Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen’s New Breathtaking Dance Center Is Ready for Class

After months of practicing in a cramped space at home, young dancers have dreamed of training in a spacious, airy studio. And when the facilities are as resplendent as the brand-new dance center at Michigan's Interlochen Center for the Arts, everyday technique class is to be savored.

The recently renovated and vastly expanded 26,000-square-foot Dance Center at Interlochen is now a world-class facility on par with those of premier conservatories and professional companies. Joseph Morrissey, Interlochen's director of dance, says a lot of careful thought went into the architecture: "This could not just be a building that dance is going to go into. This is a building that is made for dance." To build the best facilities for his students, Morrissey sought out Flansburgh Architects, the group behind the beautiful Perles Family Studio at Jacob's Pillow.

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July 2021