Pop Culture

From JLaw to Ralph Fiennes, Here Are the Danciest Movies in the Works for 2018

Oleg Ivenko as Rudolf Nureyev in The White Crow. Photo by Jessica Forde, Courtesy Sony Pictures Classics

Oh, Hollywood. In any given year, Tinseltown's use of dance in film veers from the woefully disappointing to the surprisingly delightful, but one thing's for certain: It's rarely boring. Here's our not-at-all-comprehensive and completely-subject-to-change list of the new dance-related movies coming soon to a theater (or laptop screen) near you.


Red Sparrow

Based on Jason Matthews' novel of the same name, the feature film tells the story of an ex-ballerina-turned-Russian-spy (Jennifer Lawrence) and her entanglement with a CIA agent. Crosses, double-crosses and an ill-timed romance ensue, but the real excitement comes from the ballet talent in the cast and crew: Sergei Polunin has a role, Isabella Boylston is Lawrence's dance double and Justin Peck was brought on to choreograph. In theaters March 2.

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

We aren't sure how much dancing will be in the final cut of this live-action take on the E.T.A. Hoffmann story that inspired the ubiquitous ballet, but amongst the Hollywood A-listers is one very familiar name: Misty Copeland. She'll lead what may well be the only major dance sequence in the movie, with choreography by Liam Scarlett. In theaters Nov. 2.

Suspiria

A fan-made trailer for the 1977 original

A remake of the 1977 horror movie of the same name, it follows a young American dancer (Dakota Johnson) who travels to Berlin to study at a prestigious academy where things quickly take a dark turn. Johnson trained in dance in preparation for her role, but we're expecting more emphasis on terror than technique. Tentatively slated for a 2018 release.

The White Crow

Oleg Ivenko stars as Rudolf Nureyev in The White Crow. Photo by Jessica Forde, Courtesy Premier

Based on Julie Kavanagh's Rudolf Nureyev: The Life, the Ralph Fiennes–directed drama focuses on the circumstances surrounding the dance legend's 1961 defection. Gabrielle Tana, who produced the Sergei Polunin documentary DANCER, developed and is co-producing the project. The cast includes Russian dancer Oleg Ivenko (as Nureyev) as well as Polunin, with choreography by Johan Kobborg. Tentatively slated for a 2018 release.

Untitled Tiler Peck documentary

A new documentary on NYCB star Tiler Peck is in production. Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB

Directed by Steven Cantor (who previously directed DANCER) and with actress Elisabeth Moss as an executive producer, the documentary will follow the New York City Ballet star as she prepares for her curatorial debut with BalletNOW, which took place at The Music Center's Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles last July. The program's cast was ridiculously star-studded, with dancers from NYCB, American Ballet Theatre, Paris Opéra Ballet, The Royal Ballet and Dorrance Dance joining Peck. We can't wait to see the backstage shenanigans. Slated for release on Hulu in 2018.

Yuli

A dance-centric biopic based on Carlos Acosta's memoir—and starring Acosta and his company—is in production. Photo by Kristie Kahns

Carlos Acosta will star in this biopic, produced by BBC Films and inspired by his memoir No Way Home, charting his rise to the top of the ballet world. The film's script is from Paul Laverty, best known for his searing, socially conscious work with British director Kenneth Loach. Acosta Danza will also appear in dance sequences choreographed by Acosta. Release date TBA.

Carmen

Benjamin Millepied is making his feature-film directorial debut with a new Carmen. Photo by Agathe Poupeney, Courtesy Paris Opéra Ballet

Benjamin Millepied's directorial debut for a feature-length film will be a contemporary musical drama inspired by the iconic opera. Millepied will once again choreograph for the big screen (having previously done so for Black Swan) and is working with a creative team that includes composer Nicholas Britell (Moonlight). Filming is expected to begin early this year. Release date TBA.

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In the middle of one of New York City Center's cavernous studios, Misty Copeland takes a measured step backwards. The suggestion of a swan arm ripples before she turns downstage, chest and shoulders unfurling as her legs stretch into an open lunge. She piqués onto pointe, arms echoing the sinuous curve of her back attitude, then walks out of it, pausing to warily look over her shoulder. As the droning of Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto's mysterious "Attack/Transition" grows more insistent, her feet start to fly with a rapidity that seems to almost startle her.

And then she stops mid-phrase. Copeland's hands fall to her hips as she apologizes. Choreographer Kyle Abraham slides to the sound system to pause the music, giving Copeland a moment to remind herself of a recent change to the sequence.

"It's different when the sound's on!" he reassures her. "And it's a lot of changes."

The day before was the first time Abraham had seen Copeland dance the solo in its entirety, and the first moment they were in the studio together in a month. This is their last rehearsal, save for tech, before the premiere of Ash exactly one week later, as part of the opening night of City Center's Fall for Dance festival.

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Left: Hurricane Harvey damage in Houston Ballet's Dance Lab; Courtesy Harlequin. Right: The Dance Lab pre-Harvey; Nic Lehoux, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

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