Dance History

Celebrate Jerome Robbins' Would-Be 100th Birthday With 10 Rarely-Seen Photos

Jerome Robbins would have been 100 years old on October 11, 2018. Photo by Frederic Ohringer, Courtesy DM Archives

2018 has seen an endless parade of celebrations in anticipation of Jerome Robbins' centennial—and now the day has finally arrived. In honor of what would have been his 100th birthday, we dove into our photo archives and selected a few favorite shots of the choreographer whose career defined (and redefined) American dance.


A young Robbins, 1944

Photo courtesy DM Archives

Robbins with Nancy Walker, the lead in his 1948 Broadway musical Look, Ma, I'm Dancin'!

Photo by Eileen Darby, Courtesy DM Archives

Robbins in Balanchine's Tyl Ulenspiegel, 1951

Photo by Walter E. Owen, Courtesy DM Archives

A rehearsal for The Concert (or, The Perils of Everybody), 1960

Photo by CBS Television Network, Courtesy DM Archives

Robbins (center) rehearsing West Side Story

Photo by Friedman-Abeles, Courtesy DM Archives

Robbins giving notes to Maria Karnilova and Zero Mostel, of the 1964 Broadway cast of Fiddler on the Roof

Photo by Eileen Darby-Graphic House, Courtesy DM Archives

Robbins (left) with Balanchine (bottom left) and the choreographers for NYCB's 1972 Stravinsky Festival

Photo courtesy DM Archives

Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, Paolo Bortoluzzi, Malika Sabirova, Violette Verdy, Muzafar Bourkhanov, Robbins, Antoinette Sibley, Antony Dowell, Patricia McBride, Helgi Tomasson and Carla Fracci at the Spoleto Festival, 1973

Photo by Lionello Fabbri, Courtesy DM Archives

Robbins and Antoinette Sibley rehearse his Afternoon of a Faun

Photo by Michael Childers, Courtesy DM Archives

Carmen de Lavallade and Robbins chat with Yves St. Laurent

Photo by Whitestone Photo, Courtesy DM Archives

The Conversation
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Courtesy Ritzel

Capezio, Bloch, So Dança, Gaynor Minden.

At the top of the line, dancers have plenty of quality footwear options to choose from, and in most metropolitan areas, stores to go try them on. But for many of North America's most economically disadvantaged dance students, there has often been just one option for purchasing footwear in person: Payless ShoeSource.

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Trending
Jayme Thornton

When Sonya Tayeh saw Moulin Rouge! for the first time, on opening night at a movie theater in Detroit, she remembers not only being inspired by the story, but noticing the way it was filmed.

"What struck me the most was the pace, and the erratic feeling it had," she says. The camera's quick shifts and angles reminded her of bodies in motion. "I was like, 'What is this movie? This is so insane and marvelous and excessive,' " she says. "And excessive is I think how I approach dance. I enjoy the challenge of swiftness, and the pushing of the body. I love piling on a lot of vocabulary and seeing what comes out."

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Dancers Trending
Robbie Fairchild in a still from In This Life, directed by Bat-Sheva Guez. Photo courtesy Michelle Tabnick PR

Back when Robbie Fairchild graced the cover of the May 2018 issue of Dance Magazine, he mentioned an idea for a short dance film he was toying around with. That idea has now come to fruition: In This Life, starring Fairchild and directed by dance filmmaker Bat-Sheva Guez, is being screened at this year's Dance on Camera Festival.

While the film itself covers heavy material—specifically, how we deal with grief and loss—the making of it was anything but: "It was really weird to have so much fun filming a piece about grief!" Fairchild laughs. We caught up with him, Guez and Christopher Wheeldon (one of In This Life's five choreographers) to find out what went into creating the 11-minute short film.

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The Creative Process
Terry Notary in a movement capture suit during the filming of Rise of the Planet of the Apes. Photo by Sigtor Kildal, Courtesy Notary

When Hollywood needs to build a fantasy world populated with extraordinary creatures, they call Terry Notary.

The former gymnast and circus performer got his start in film in 2000 when Ron Howard asked him to teach the actors how to move like Whos for How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Notary has since served as a movement choreographer, stunt coordinator and performer via motion capture technology for everything from the Planet of the Apes series to The Hobbit trilogy, Avatar, Avengers: Endgame and this summer's The Lion King.

Since opening the Industry Dance Academy with his wife, Rhonda, and partners Maia and Richard Suckle, Notary also offers movement workshops for actors in Los Angeles.

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