PC Paul Kolnik

What Makes Robbins' Glass Pieces So Powerful

New York City Ballet is celebrating the Jerome Robbins Centennial with twenty (20!) ballets. The great American choreographer died in 1998, so very few of today's dancers have actually worked with him. There are plenty of stories about how demanding (at times brutally so) he could be in rehearsal. But Peter Boal has written about Robbins in a more balanced, loving way. In this post he writes about how Robbins' crystal clear imagery helped him approach a role with clarity and purpose.



Glass Pieces has this clarity and purpose without a narrative. Or, rather it's a narrative of dynamics, not a narrative of plot. He worked with lighting designer Ronald Bates to give us a graph-paper grid on the backdrop that relates to the cumulative mathematics of Philip Glass' music. This 1983 ballet is divided into three parts: simple walking, an ethereal duet backed by a more stylized walking, and a striding low run that's gone way beyond walking. The mounting kinetic excitement pulls you in. It makes you feel the humanness of the dancers at the same time as you notice patterns, whether they look random, as in the first section, or shot from a cannon, as in the third section.

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Courtesy Bloch

The BLOCHspot + Alcyone Sneaker Are What Dancers Actually Need in 2021

Almost a year later and...yep, we're still in a global pandemic. As COVID-19 drags on, your pre-pandemic footwear is probably on its last legs by now (if it was ever up to dancing all day on floors that aren't sprung). And even when we do finally return to the stage, dancing in non-traditional spaces is a trend that's likely to stick around. Sporting a new pair of kicks designed specially for dancers might be just the boost you need to meet the dance world's "new normal" head-on.

Here, everything you need to know about the next-generation sneaker and handy spin spot that'll make this spring feel like the fresh start dancers deserve.

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February 2021