Marquese "Nonstop" Scott Brings Jaw-Dropping Animation to Venice Beach

Earlier this month, tap dancer Ryan P. Casey tweeted, "Not seeing a lot of pics of people leaping on the beach..... Are all the dancers out there okay?!?"

Fear not, Ryan. Dancers on layoff are getting their moves on at the beach everywhere from Denmark to The Rockaways.

But in our (very subjective) opinion, no one does a beach day quite like Marquese "Nonstop" Scott. The uber-popular animation dancer recently spent a weekend at Venice Beach making a series of short dance films. As usual, we're entranced by his mind-boggling popping, tutting and footwork. But what we love about this series in particular is how he embodies the SoCal vibe so perfectly—it makes us want to pack our swimsuits and head straight for L.A.

 

Scott's feet in this solo appear to skate along the boardwalk as the rest of him snakes and pops through a series of isolations, each body part getting its own moment to shine. Almost as entertaining is watching the reactions from surprised passersby.

 

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In this collaboration with fellow animation dancer Dytto, Scott melts into mesmerizing slow motion. If it weren't for the fact that he's moving right next to Dytto, his incredible body control would make the speed look like a trick of the camera.

 

Here, let's just say #squadgoals. Our favorite part of this video is the duet that starts about 30 seconds in, when Scott picks up the tempo and passes the movement back and forth with Julius "iGlide" Chisolm. Yes, they're wearing a lotta clothes for so much sunshine. But we love how they become part of the brightly-colored street art.

Who else is ready for a beach day?

 

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