Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener, PC Charles Villyard

Rashaun Mitchell + Silas Riener Keep Challenging Conventions For The Joyce's Quadrille Series

In 2016, Lar Lubovitch decided that New York City's Joyce Theater needed a new look. He envisioned extending the stage outward so that audiences could sit on all sides. And that is pretty much what happened for his Quadrille series, and it was so refreshing that the series returns this year, with a new bunch of intrepid choreographers. I say intrepid because the choreography may be seen from unplanned angles, and the dancers are more exposed.

For the audience, if you're sitting under hundreds of lighting instruments overhead, you naturally feel like you are onstage. And if you're sitting in the usual seats, you see the performers onstage, with half the audience behind them. The whole set-up can be pleasantly disorienting.


Next up in the Quadrille series are Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener, who have been challenging conventions for years—which is why they appeared on the cover of our issue on dance renegades. In their new piece, SWITCH, the dancers navigate between set choreography and any impulse of the moment that may strike them as desirable. It may sound a bit chaotic, but it's clear that Riener and Mitchell are again challenging a convention: the assumption that choreography is made up of steps.

The whole series runs until October 13, and Mitchell + Riener are October 2–6.

Latest Posts


Studio Bleu students Jaxon Keller, Samantha Halker and Alia Wiggins. Photos by Chris Stark

How Turning Boards and Practice Mats Can Revolutionize Your Dance Training

When it comes to equipment, dancers don't need much—just shoes and whatever can fit in their dance bag. But between rehearsals in the studio and performances on stage, one major piece of equipment often goes overlooked—the floor.

Dancers too often find themselves warming up on the concrete or carpet backstage, or wanting to practice in a location without a proper floor. For years, Harlequin Floors has offered a solution to this problem with its innovative turning board, offering a portable and personal floor that can be flipped between marley and wood. Now, they've revolutionized portability again with their practice mat, offering dancers the option to roll up their own personal floor and sling it over their shoulders like a yoga mat.

We spoke with experts from every corner of the dance industry to see how Harlequin's products have become their everyday essentials:

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS