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Tap Nerds Unite

Want to win $500 worth of tap classes? Or, want to learn about the history of tap dance?

If you are anywhere near New York City, immerse yourself in the lore of tap this week. New York is one of the cities where tap dance was born. Go on a treasure hunt to find the exact locales where the tap legends danced.

After you register (there’s still time), pick up your Tap Treasures Map, go on the treasure hunt at your own pace, decode the clues and take pictures. Then come to the Tap Attack Event celebrating National Tap Dance Day on Sunday, May 24, at Pier 45, presided over by American Tap Dance Foundation director Tony Waag. Tap masters Brenda Bufalino, Felipe Galganni and Michela Marino Lerman will shuffle along as prizes are given out.

Why is ATDF doing this? “I want everyone to remember who Gregory Hines was, Donald O’Connor, Honi Coles and the Copasetics. We are trying to connect the famous locations and people that contributed to the development of tap dance, right here in NYC, where tap was born,” says Waag, who, along with Bufalino, was a Dance Magazine Awardee last year.

Click here for more info.

 

 

Above: Michela Marino Lerman.

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