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#JustDreaming About The Women Who Could Lead New York City Ballet

Wendy Whelan with Kyle Abraham

While it's appalling that any male leader would use his power to humiliate women, the accusations against Peter Martins opens up a wonderful, rosy possibility. In an email conversation about Martins stepping down temporarily, a friend of mine wrote, "They won't hire a man in this climate."

I suddenly found myself getting giddy with the thought that a woman might lead New York City Ballet. I pictured a former NYCB principal coming in and calming the dancers down, respecting them, inspiring them, treating them like adults, listening to them and encouraging communication between all factions of the company.


Who would be a prime candidate to lead this company of incredible dancers and vast repertoire? I think right away of Wendy Whelan, who has proven to be adventurous as an impresario (coming up with Restless Creature), has taught in many situations, and is known to be kind and decent in every situation. Her "Why I Dance" says it all.

Also top-notch is Lourdes Lopez, who has proven herself at Miami City Ballet. While presenting a Dance Magazine Award to visionary healer Marika Molnar on Monday, she gave an eloquent talk about handing down the wisdom of taking care of your body. Lourdes was included in our list of the "Most Influential People in Dance Today" in July.

Maybe I'm #justdreaming. But with the allegations getting more serious, this is a real possibility. Who would you like to see take over NYCB?

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